Recommendations

10 New Year Family Goals (Pedcast)

Topic Introduction

I read a lot of articles about child health and one that caught my eye recently came from a weekly newsletter that is created by the staff of fellow North Carolina pediatricians, the Salisbury Pediatric Associates. The article that I am going to discuss today was written by pediatrician Dr. Christopher Magryta. In it he posted ten goals for parents and children for the New Year. I thought his goals were so useful, practical, and full of wisdom that I wanted to share them with you.  I think each of Dr. Magryta’s goals will help you kick off the New Year in a great direction, for both you and your family. So here goes, straight from Dr. Magryta in his own words.  I hope you find it as inspiring as I did. Don’t miss today’s post, 10 New Year Family Goals Continue reading

Sleep Away Camp Readiness? (Pedcast)

Voice introduction

Welcome to Portable Practical Pediatrics. I’m your host, Dr. Paul Smolen, a board certified pediatrician and now an experienced blogger. Can you believe it; I started broadcasting in June of 2010. I’m rapidly approaching 7 years of weekly blogging, 84,000 downloads to date, and a million pages opened each year on my blog!  Thanks to you, we have created one of the most popular pediatric blogs in the country. What an honor. Thank you.

Recently, I was interviewed by a Charlotte parenting blog about sending children to sleep away camp. I answered a series of questions for their post and the thought crossed my mind, “Maybe my blog audience would be interested in this subject? I think so.”  So in today’s edition of Portable Practical Pediatrics, we are going to explore some aspects of sending your child to sleep away camp. Maybe some of my answers can help you and your child make the most of this important experience of childhood. If you are thinking about away camp for your little ones this summer, don’t miss this pedcast! Continue reading

Parent’s Guide to Childhood Immunization (Book Review Pedcast)

Parent’s Guide to Childhood Immunization

Written and Published by the US Department of Health and Human Services/ Center for Disease Control

August 2015

Introduction

Interest in vaccine safety has been, and continues to be, a hot topic with parents and the media. Unfortunately, from where I sit, the AAP and others professional organizations have been missing in action when it comes to mounting an effective media campaign to educate parents and counter much of the misinformation parents are exposed to. I have been to professional meetings where my pediatrician colleagues have stood up and railed at our professional organization for not being very visible in this important debate. Given that as background, it was of great interest when I came across a new handbook, written and published by the US Department of Health and Human Services and the CDC, laying out the facts including vaccine safety.  Maybe as the number of outbreaks of measles, whooping cough, and mumps continue to climb, organizations like these will put more effort toward countering the messaging from people and organizations that are opposed to vaccines.  I actually think this beginning to happen since many state legislatures, public health groups, and even the AAP have been becoming more public about their support for vaccines. My guess is that it will take at least five positive vaccine messages to counter the unrealistic fear that one negative message about vaccines can create. Multiple positive messages from multiple reliable sources, on an ongoing basis, are what are needed. That’s why is this handbook is significant in my opinion so let’s get into the details of my review. Continue reading

Are Your Kids Fit for Life? (Pedcast)


Topic Introduction:

So here is something that you and your children should think about.  Unless your child develops a major illness, each and every morning that your child gets up out of bed, they are a little stronger, a little faster, and they are a little smarter than they were the day before.  During the previous day, their little bodies had a chance to grow new cells in all of their organs.  Compared to the day before, their hearts got a little bigger as did their lungs, their kidneys, and their brains. And of course, you are not paying attention if you don’t notice the tremendous increase in their cognitive abilities– they get smarter everyday. There is this steady march of growth and increase function all during childhood that halts sometime between 20 and 30 years of age. Today, we are going to explore this phenomena in a little more detail and talk about why this aging/growth curve has tremendous relevance for your children.  So sit back, crank up the mp3 player or computer and listen to today’s pedcast that I call “Making Kids Fit for Life”. Continue reading

1 2 7