Tag Archives: anthropology

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #65 – Mark Houston, M.D. – Cardiovascular Health

Dr. Mark Houston is a thinker and researcher into the root causes of cardiovascular disease and metabolism. He graduated from Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee summa cum laude in Chemistry before graduating with honors from Vanderbilt Medical School. He completed his medical internship and residency at the University of California, San Francisco, then returned to Vanderbilt Medical Center where he was chief resident in medicine and served on the full- time faculty until 2012. He is the current director of the hypertension Institute where he and his team develop novel approaches to hypertension and ASCVD by attending to root biological causes of disease. He also has a Master’s degree in Human Nutrition from the University of Bridgeport, Connecticut, and a Masters of Science degree in Functional and Metabolic Medicine from the University of South Florida in Tampa Florida. He has written hundreds of papers, books and chapters on cardiovascular disease. He is one of the top researchers in the preventative cardiology space and he is here today to share his wisdom.
His book credits:
Handbook of Antihypertensive Therapy
Vascular Biology for the Clinician
What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Hypertension
Hypertension Handbook for Students and Clinicians
The Hypertension Handbook
What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Heart Disease.
Please enjoy my conversation with Dr. Mark Houston,
Dr. M
Hypertension Institute

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #62 – Jeff Bland, Ph.D. – The Disease Delusion and Hope for Change

Podcast #62
Jeff Bland, Ph.D.
This week I have the absolute pleasure to introduce you to Dr. Jeff Bland. He is in a word, incredible.
Dr. Bland is supreme thinker in the field of medicine and biology. He is a teacher, product developer, thought leader, unifier of minds and so much more. He obtained his BS in Biology at the University of California at Irvine and then a PhD from the University of Oregon. Dr. Bland was thinking about medicine from a root cause perspective decades before it became more vogue to believe in Integrative medicine. He is the founder of the Institute for Functional Medicine as well as his new company Big Bold Health, a company on a mission to transform the way people think about one of nature’s greatest innovations — the immune system. With Big Bold Health, he is pushing for the power of cellular immuno-rejuvenation through food to enhance immunity at a human level. The key is the rediscovery of ancient food crops and superfoods that have these properties of health promotion.
We wander the landscape of human health through bramble and brook without a care in the world. It is a most enjoyable conversation to share.
Enjoy,
Dr. M

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #53 – Peter Ungar, PhD – Teeth and History

This weeks guest is Dr. Peter Ungar. Dr. Ungar serves as Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Environmental Dynamics PhD Program at the University of Arkansas. He received his PhD in Anthropological Sciences from Stony Brook University and taught Gross Anatomy in the medical schools at Johns Hopkins and Duke before joining the University of Arkansas faculty in 1995. He is an Honorary Research Fellow of the Center for the Exploration of the Deep Human Journey at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa.
Ungar has written or coauthored more than 200 scientific works on ecology and evolution for journals like Science, Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Scientific American, and more. His work has focused on teeth, food choices and feeding in living primates, and the role of diet and environmental change in the evolution of human ancestors and other fossil species.
We dive into the world of teeth, evolution and out current state of existence in modern society. Are our teeth matched for this environment?
Enjoy,
Dr. M

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #45 – Briana Pobiner PhD– Origins of Human Meat Consumption

Briana Pobiner PhD
This weeks guest is super interesting. Briana Pobiner is a paleoanthropologist whose research centers on the evolution of human diet with a focus on meat-eating. Briana has a BA from Bryn Mawr College, where she created her own major called Evolutionary Studies. Then she completed a Masters degree followed by her PhD in Anthropology from Rutgers University. Briana is also an Associate Research Professor of Anthropology in the Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology at the George Washington University.
She has done fieldwork in Kenya, Tanzania, South Africa, and Indonesia and has been supported in her research by the National Geographic Society, the National Science Foundation and the Society for American Archaeology. We discuss some of her favorite field moments including a run in with a white rhino as well as discovering fossil bones that were last touched, butchered and eaten by one of her 1.5-million-year-old ancestors. Since joining the Smithsonian in 2005 to help put together the Hall of Human Origins, in addition to continuing her active field, laboratory, and experimental research programs, she leads the Human Origins Program’s education and outreach efforts which includes managing the Human Origins Program’s public programs, website content, social media, and exhibition volunteer training. Briana has also more recently developed a research program in evolution education and science communication. She is the recipient of the 2021 American Association of Biological Anthropologists and Leakey Foundation Communication and Outreach Award in Honor of Camilla Smith, and a 2021 National Center for Science Education Friend of Darwin award.
Enjoy,
Dr. M

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #14 – Dr. Richard Johnson, Nature Wants Us To Be Fat

Richard J. Johnson, M.D. is the Tomas Berl Professor of Medicine and the Chief of the Renal Division and Hypertension at the University of Colorado since 2008. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, with a major in Anthropology, and a graduate of the University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, he is a physician and nephrologist whose research has focused on the role of sugar, and especially fructose, in driving obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and kidney disease. Much of this work has explored the role of fructose metabolism, especially the generation of uric acid, in driving this phenotype, and his work has included studies ranging from molecular biology, integrative physiology, and evolutionary biology. He is the author of The Sugar Fix which introduced the first low fructose diet, and also The Fat Switch which explores the role of fructose in driving the obesity epidemic. His newest book, Nature Wants Us To Be Fat, is a tour de force of the entire pathway of survival via metabolic events in the body related to fructose and the polyol pathway. This is a must read book. This podcast will introduce you to the exceptional work of Dr. Johnson and how we are now mismatched metabolically for the environment of modern America and our food systems.

Please enjoy this wide ranging conversation.

Dr. M

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast – Putting It All Together #2

This week on the show, I sit down to put the recent four maternal/child health podcasts into perspective. How are these four experts tied together? We, again, examine the basic underpinnings of maternal health risks through the eyes of these thought leaders in preparation for the next series of discussions. Laying important foundations to build our health literacy upon, is critical in my mind. This show is also a way for the folks that are “on the go” to get a summary of the podcasts for their benefit.

Enjoy,

Dr. M

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #11 – Dr. EA Quinn, Breastfeeding Through History

Dr. EA Quinn and I had a wide ranging discussion on breastmilk from an evolutionary perspective for podcast episode #11.
Dr. Quinn is a biological anthropologist with a specialty in human biology. Her research is broadly focused on understanding the ways in which human milk is an essential part of human biological variation and how such variation has been selected for by different ecological pressures.
Her primary research project at present is Infancy @Altitude, a longitudinal birth cohort study of ethnic Tibetan mothers and infants living in the Nubri Valley, Nepal. She is investigating the ways in which ecological pressures – in this case the ecological pressures of hypoxia, chronic cold stress, shorter growing seasons, UV radiation, and infectious diseases – create selective pressures on human milk and how this translates into adaptive patterns of child growth.
One of the major findings of this research was elevated milk fat in the high altitude sample compared to other previously studied human populations and lower levels of metabolic hormones than predicted based on maternal body composition.
Breastmilk is a magical human derived food and medicine all wrapped up into one. The magnificence of human milk is on full display during this hour long podcast.
I hope that you enjoy my conversation with Dr. EA Quinn,
Dr. M