Tag Archives: health

The Lunchroom Lowdown: Bathroom Boot Camp (Article)

I was telling my partners about Bathroom Boot Camp at lunch last week. The topic of potty training comes up regularly for pediatricians, and they were happy to share their experience for this blog. I posed the question, “What have you found are important things for families to remember when training and maintaining continence in their children?” Their answers were very informative. Here is a glimpse:
 

Dr. Monica Miller, one of my young “GenX” partners, felt that reward and a positive attitude are important. Parents need to set the correct ambiance and mood. She feels that the bathroom experience should be slow, not rushed. She also emphasizes highlighting success. She recommends a “Potty Parade” after each success: “Let’s celebrate! The toilet success is so important that we need to have a party!” Her approach emphasizes patience, praise, and fun. Dr. Miller thinks that the most difficult children to train are those who are very intelligent or those who have difficulty adjusting to uncomfortable sensory experiences.

 

Dr. John Plonk, on the other hand, is one of the older doctors (mid fifties) that I work with. He is definitely a boomer. He grew up on a farm with days full of hard farm labor. His young life was dominated by work, dirt, and animals, so his attitude is “let’s get the job done.” He suggests letting children observe animals around them, learning through imitation. “Everyone pees and poops,” he says, “even animals. Children just need to observe what is happening around them and do as they do.” Being outside most of the day facilitates training since the deeds can be done anywhere; this method encourages children to take charge and be the masters of their own domains. Also, it’s hard to mess up too badly outside. Dr. Plonk recommends celebrating success with what he calls Flushing Fiestas: “Kids love to flush toilets, so make that their reward for cooperation when indoors.” Dr. Plonk also feels that a diet rich in “P” fruits promotes success: pears, plums, peaches, pomegranates, and popcorn. A great suggestion, and easy to remember. He recommends avoiding bananas and limiting dairy and cheese during the training process, for obvious reasons.

 

Dr. Kimberly Riley“If your stomach hurts, you need to poop, it’s that simple.” No wimpy poop for her patients, they need good volume. To achieve this, she emphasizes the relaxed bathroom, much like Dr. Miller. She recommends taking advantage of the gastro-colic reflex, the reflex that empties your child’s colon just after eating. “Routine toilet sitting is important, and don’t rush.” She encourages the parents of her patients to allow videogame use only in the bathroom. Dr. Riley declares, “Finally a good use for a video game!” Amen. Dr. Riley also points out that the school setting is particularly bad for regularity for many children since they do not have free access or adequate time in the bathroom while at school. Be aware of this fact as a parent, and make the necessary adjustments when possible. Dr. Riley feels that the strong willed child is the most difficult to train.

 
I hope some of these insights are helpful to families as they deal with the often-difficult task of potty training. I think the main thing to remember is that all normal children eventually master the entire bathroom experience. Be patient and don’t go negative. Remember, your child is the only one who can actually control their sphincters, both rectal and urinary; to have ultimate success, your child needs to take control. I recommend creating an environment that cherishes success and encourages independence. Good luck.

 

For a complete list of this week’s potty content, check out the topic of the week!

 

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Let’s not forget to care for the Mamas and the Papas! (Pedcast)

As parents, it’s easy to become absorbed in your children’s well-being and forget to take care of yourself.  Don’t forget,  one of your most important assets is YOU. Taking care of yourself now can make a world of difference economically, physically, and mentally down the road.  In this “Pedcast”, Doc Smo reminds parents to be mindful of their well-being and illustrates some simple ways that you can improve your health for the betterment of you and your family.

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