Tag Archives: lifestyle

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 13 Issue 2

Food in Infants
What do we know?
“Humans are the only mammals who feed our young special complementary foods before weaning and we are the only primates that wean our young before they can forage independently. There appears to be a sensitive period in the first several months of life when infants readily accept a wide variety of tastes and this period overlaps with a critical window for oral tolerance.” (Borowitz S.) We do a deep dive here plus some information on the mineral calcium and a segment on loneliness.
Enjoy,
Dr. M

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #38 Donald Layman, PhD – Protein

Donald Layman is currently a Professor Emeritus at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences in the department of Food Science & Human Nutrition. Dr. Laymen earned his Bachelors Degree in Science in Chemistry and Masters Degree in Science in Biochemistry at Illinois State University. He then completed his Doctorate Ph.D. in Human Nutrition Nutrition and Biochemistry at the University of Minnesota.
His laboratory is working to define protein and amino acid requirements and the interrelationship between dietary protein and carbohydrates in adult health. The research is focused on the impact of diet and exercise on adult health problems of obesity, type 2 diabetes and the Metabolic Syndrome. Exercise is of obvious importance to health in maintenance of lean body mass, energy expenditure and weight control. Surprisingly little is known about amino acid requirements during exercise or the impact of amino acids on metabolic regulation. His group has helped to define roles of the branched chain amino acids (BCAA) in skeletal muscle metabolism. BCAA provide an important energy source for muscle during exercise and also serve as a critical regulator of muscle protein synthesis during recovery. During exercise, oxidation of BCAA increases, resulting in production of the amino acid alanine and a rapid decline in plasma levels of BCAA. Amino acid supplements prevent this decline in plasma amino acids, enhance recovery of muscle protein synthesis and interact with insulin to help stabilize blood glucose. They are continuing this research to define mechanisms for control of muscle protein synthesis and differences in dietary protein needs for men versus women and for adults with sedentary versus active lifestyles.
A very important conversation for all to understand. All ages are impacted by this knowledge.
Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 12 Issue 51

Coronavirus Update 76 plus other stuff
The work around Covid research is fading for me. This is now mostly a highly contagious upper respiratory infection for most. The morbidity has faded to a level where we are seeing very limited disease in children and the hospital data remains completely plateaued. Unless there is a dramatic shift in this virus, we are moving toward a world where Covid will be like the other 4 circulating coronaviruses for most of the United States population save for the high risk individuals as described throughout the pandemic.
Focus remains on self care to boost all immune activity to thwart all infections from all microbes.
Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 12 Issue 49

Covid Update #75

All new omicron based variants are extremely infectious but not really dangerous anymore to immunocompetent people. They are evading prior immunity as well as all vaccines to varying degrees. Morbidity remains very low now. The current bivalent vaccines are not showing any improvement over the ancestral vaccine. Death remains almost zero for all healthy previous infected or vaccinated individuals. This is likely the new norm from here on out.

This week we cover covid, vaccine effectiveness, skeletal muscle and dementia, human protein needs and function.

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #36 Nancy O’Hara – MD, MPH – PANS/CANS/PANDAS

This weeks guest is Dr. Nancy O’Hara, a leading expert in the field of basal ganglia encephalitis and pediatric abrupt onset autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders. Dr. O’Hara graduated with highest honors from Bryn Mawr College and was part of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. She earned her Master’s degree in Public Health from the University of Pittsburgh, and completed her residency, chief residency and general pediatric fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh.
Before she began her medical career, Dr. O’Hara taught children with autism. From 1993 to 1998, Dr O’Hara was a practicing general pediatrician and partner in a group practice. In 1999, she began her consultative, integrative practice for children with special needs, dedicating her practice to treating children with neurodevelopmental disorders, ADHD, PANS/PANDAS and BGE, OCD, Lyme, and Autism Spectrum Disorder.
She recently published a book, Demystifying PANS/PANDAS, a desktop reference on basal ganglia encephalitis. She spends a large bucket of her time training and teaching other clinicians how to treat these complex disorders in children.
This is a very in-depth conversation that is a full pathway of cause to effect and resolution.
Enjoy,
Dr. M

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #35 Sheila Kilbane, MD – Healthy Kids

This weeks guest is my good friend Dr. Sheila Kilbane. She is a fellow pediatrician and onion peeler of root causes of children’s diseases. Her background found her studying Zoology at Miami University before attending The Ohio State University College of Medicine. After completing her Pediatric training she went on to obtain a Fellowship in Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine. We share many desires to help families achieve immune and health solvency through upstream target manipulation that leads to happiness. Today we discuss Dr. Kilbane’s view of this world as well as her book, Healthy Kids, Happy Moms.

Enjoy,

Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 12 Issue 45

Covid Update # 73:
Omicron US strains: as of October 22nd data – variants make up: BA.4.6 is 11%, BA.2.75 is 2%, BF.7 is 7%, BA.5 is 62%, BQ.1 is 9%, BQ1.1 is 7%
BA.5 is losing ground to many new Omicron variant offshoots. BF.7, BQ.1 and BQ1.1 are very interesting as they are apparently more infectious than BA.5. That is amazing.
We look at new PASC Long Covid data as well as the world of vaccine effectiveness. And much more…
Dr. M

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