Tag Archives: food

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #34 Stephan Guyenet, PhD – Childhood Obesity Part IV – Neuroscience of Food Choice

This week, I sit down with Dr. Stephan J. Guyenet, a neuroscientist, thinker and educator.  After earning a BS in biochemistry at the University of Virginia, he completed a PhD in neuroscience at the University of Washington, then went on to study the neuroscience of obesity and eating behavior as a postdoctoral fellow.  He has over 12 years of history in the neuroscience research world studying neurodegenerative disease and the neuroscience of body fatness.  His mission is to advance science and public health as a researcher, science consultant, and science communicator.  Publishing a book, The Hungry Brain, in 2017, he laid out the framework for understanding how our brains work with food. It was named one of the best books of the year by Publishers Weekly and called “essential” by the New York Times Book Review.

Finally, he is the founder and director of Red Pen Reviews, which publishes the most informative, consistent, and unbiased popular health and nutrition book reviews available.

This hour long conversation is very stimulating as we dive headlong into the upstream targets of food choice and body outcome.

Enjoy,

Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 12 Issue 40

Dr. Katz – “Human offspring come into this world much like the young of all other mammals, and like all the others, within minutes of our arrival, we are hungry. Food figures prominently in our lives ever after, but never is it more important than in childhood, when it serves as the literal construction material of those growing bodies and brains. The initial food choice for human babies should be self-evident, as it is for all other baby mammals: the milk of their mothers. The provision of that milk is among the defining characteristics of the mammalian class; it is part of what makes us what we are….

Also, we discuss marijuana and vaping as well as new work by Derek Sivers.

Enjoy,

Dr. M

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #24 – Dr. Lindsey Albenberg – Nutrition, microbiome and the bowel.

My guest this week is Dr. Lindsey Albenberg. We sit down to discuss all things gastrointestinal as it relates to children, nutrition, inflammation and health. Dr. Albenberg is a physician in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and a member of the research team in the Center for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. She primarily studies inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) as they relate to nutrition, the microbiome and overall health. She has been published in top journals including Gut, Journal of Clinical Investigation and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. She is known for her teaching skills and has won many awards as a resident and an attending physician.

We discuss many layers of the evolving understanding of where the touch points are in the development of a dysfunctional microbiome and subsequently inflammatory diseases. She gives us high quality dietary information based on the current data for how to approach food with children and adults. We delve into Covid 19 a little and some other tidbits of useful take home points.

I hope that you will enjoy my conversation with Dr. Lindsey Albenberg,

Dr. M

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast – Putting It All Together #2

This week on the show, I sit down to put the recent four maternal/child health podcasts into perspective. How are these four experts tied together? We, again, examine the basic underpinnings of maternal health risks through the eyes of these thought leaders in preparation for the next series of discussions. Laying important foundations to build our health literacy upon, is critical in my mind. This show is also a way for the folks that are “on the go” to get a summary of the podcasts for their benefit.

Enjoy,

Dr. M

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #12 – Lily Nichols, Nutrition and Pregnancy

Lily Nichols and I had a lovely discussion on maternal nutrition for podcast episode #12.
Lily Nichols is a registered dietician and a seeker of best practices in nutrition based on cutting edge science and not American Diatetic Association dogma. She is thoughtful and dedicated to helping mothers and mother’s to be navigate the crazy world of food and health.
Her website states:
Standard prenatal nutrition advice is due for an overhaul. Evidence is mounting that real food offers optimal nourishment for mamas and babies.
This statement encapsulates everything that I believe in. We need change around our relationship to food and health and there is no more important place to start than with mom.
I hope that you enjoy my conversation with Lily Nichols,
Dr. M

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #3 – Dr. Randy Jirtle and the Discovery of Maternal Risk

Dr. Randy Jirtle joins the show today to discuss his groundbreaking research that ushered in the era of epigenetics. Time Magazine nominated him for person of the year in 2007 and had this to say about him: “Dr. Jirtle’s pioneering work in epigenetics and genomic imprinting has uncovered a vast territory in which a gene represents less of an inexorable sentence and more of an access point for the environment to modify the genome. His trailblazing discoveries have produced a far more complete and useful understanding of human development and diseases” — Time Magazine. This interview is ground zero for the Women and Children First Podcast as we discuss the underpinnings or mechanisms of disease risk for all humans as it relates to the environmental inputs of our lives that are driving health or disease at both the pregnancy and post natal periods. We look specifically at how maternal nutrition and later chemical exposure directly affected the health of the agouti mouse offspring. This experiment was the first of its kind and paved the way for a complete shift in human disease understanding. For parents, this podcast is really the beginning of everything that I am trying to convey regarding a healthy pregnancy and childhood. Without this interview, the following interviews will be more difficult to understand. The picture becomes very clear once his research is cemented in our minds.

His biography is as follows: Professor of Epigenetics at the Department of Biological Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, and a Senior Scientist at McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI. He was previously professor of radiation oncology and associate professor of pathology at Duke University, Durham, NC, where he had been a faculty member since 1977. He graduated with a B.S. degree in nuclear engineering in 1970 and a Ph.D. degree in radiation biology in 1976, from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His awards list is long but the key to Dr. Jirtle is that he is a curious thinker and we are grateful for this.

Please enjoy my conversation with Dr. Randy Jirtle,

Dr. M

Fast Food: More bad news (Article)

It is common knowledge that fast food is not good for our children’s health. Recent research confirms what we already knew: an extensive new study correlates consumption of fast food with a child’s increased chance of developing asthma and allergies. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood surveyed nearly half a million six- and seven-year-olds and thirteen- and fourteen-year-olds across 31 and 51 countries, respectively. The study found that teenagers who consume fast food more than three times a week are 40% more likely to develop asthma, while children aged six or seven who also eat fast food more than three times a week are 27% more likely to suffer from asthma. Additionally, both the six- and seven-year-olds and teenagers who frequently dined on fast food suffered from increased frequency of food allergies, eczema, and allergic rhinitis (hay fever).

Clearly, the researchers have provided us with valuable information, but much more work needs to be done to confirm the study’s results. Many factors are undoubtedly at play beneath the surface. While overconsumption of fast food seems to be associated with an increase in many allergic diseases in children, excessive eating of processed fast food may not totally explain why children are, on average, more allergic than their older relatives. Other factors undoubtedly contribute to the problem.

Nonetheless, this new information provides us with things we can do TODAY to lessen a child’s chance of allergy: providing a more traditional diet rich in fruits and vegetables may be part of the solution. By simply visiting the produce aisle instead of swinging by the nearest drive-through, a child’s health and quality of life can be changed for the better. Replacing processed sugars, carbohydrates, and preservatives with natural foods is the first step towards a healthier lifestyle and possibly less allergy disease for both you and your children.

Your comments are welcome at www.docsmo.com. Let me hear what your think. For more timely medical updates about children, subscribe to DocSmo.com on iTunes or follow him on Facebook or Twitter.  Until next time.

Smo notes:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2013/jan/14/fast-food-child-asthma-allergies

Authored by Keri Register, Davidson College intern and Paul Smolen MD