Tag Archives: probiotics

Probiotic Promises Deliver (Article)

For years, researchers have felt that some species of bacteria introduced into the stomachs of children make their immune systems stronger and better able to fend off illness. As a group, these microbes are termed probiotic. A few years ago, physicians in Israel put this theory to the test and found that, indeed, some types of bacteria (Lactobacillus Reuteri and Bifidobacterium lactis) did make young children more able to fight off gastrointestinal viral infections. Recently, in the January issue of the journal Pediatrics, we now have good evidence that children on this side of the Atlantic get benefit from the same type of healthy probiotic bacteria.


Dr. Pedro Gutierrez-Castrellon, MD, DSc studied 336 children attending daycare in Mexico City. The study was designed well, being randomly assigned, double blinded, and placebo controlled. Studies designed this way generally yield accurate results, and indeed, the results were dramatic. Children who received the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus Reuteri had very dramatic improvement in the following health measures: the number of days with diarrhea or respiratory illness was reduced among the treatment group by a whooping 66%; antibiotic use, days absent from daycare, and number of visits to a healthcare facility were also significantly reduced. What is not to love about probiotics for children?! We now have two well designed studies coming to the same conclusion: certain types of probiotics improve the health of young children.


Integrative pediatricians have been telling us for years that probiotics and cultured/fermented foods, loaded with bacteria and other microbes, improve the health of both children and adults. This latest study proves that they were right. It is time that we stop looking at all microbes as our enemies and learn how to harness the incredible power of some of earth’s smallest creatures. For more on this fascinating subject, take a few minutes and listen to integrative pediatrician Sheila Kilbane talk about the power of probiotics on an archived DocSmo.com:


https://www.docsmo.com/probiotics-update-with-dr-sheila-kilbane-pedcast/


Your comments are welcome!  Until next time.

Written by Paul Smolen M.D.


Smo Notes:

1. http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2014/03/11/peds.2013-0652

2.   http://www.italchimici.net/Docs_library/Weizman%20probiot%20comparison_Lr%2005.pdf

Avoiding Ear Infections, Dr. Sheila Kilbane (Pedcast)

Doc Smo here, your pedcast host.  Thanks for joining me  today for another edition of DocSmo.com, the pediatric podcast dedicated to children and their parents.  I am very fortunate to have as my returning guest, Dr. Sheila Kilbane, an integrative pediatrician and expert about much of life, to talk to us about a very common pediatric health problem, otitis media.  Anyone with children is very familiar with how frequently children are affected by otitis media or middle ear infections.  These infections are complications of bad colds and we all know that children get a lot of colds. So lets see how an integrative pediatrician approaches a child with  recurrent ear infections.   Maybe Dr. Kilbane just might be able to help your children avoid that ear infection nastiness.

 

Welcome Dr. Kilbane.

 

 

Question 1:Why do children get ear infections?

 

Question 2: For children with CHRONIC EAR INFECTIONS of CHRONIC EAR CONGESTION, how does the Integrative approach different than traditional pediatrics?

(Decrease mucous/ enhance immune response/ decrease inflammation/avoid antibiotics)

 

Question 3: How do you do these things?

(Stop dairy, probiotics, vitamin D, immunocap, correct structural problems)

 

Question 4: Which children do you suspect have structural problems in their Eustachian tubes?

 

Question 5: How do you reduce inflammation in a child’s body?

 

Question 6: Which children is the integrative approach most appropriate for?

 

Let’s summarize the integrative approach

-Reduce mucous production from inhaled allergy and oral allergy to food, mostly milk

-Correct structural problems

-Enhance child’s immune system

-Reduce inflammation by changing diet

 

 

Outro

 

Well, Dr. Kilbane, as always, you bring a fresh approach and viewpoint to both parents and physicians and I really appreciate that. You and I are on the same page, we both want to inform parents and make things better for children. I can’t thank you enough for sharing your time and expertise with us today.

 

This is Dr. Paul Smolen, you know, Doc Smo, thanking you for joining us and hoping your little dears, always have nice clear ears.  Until next time.

 

Dr. Kilbane on “Winterizing” Your Children (Pedcast)

Integrative pediatrics is all about disease prevention and wellness.  Listen to a conversation with our very own integrative consultant, Dr. Sheila Kilbane, when she tells parents how to reduce their children’s chance of getting sick this winter.

 

SmoNotes:

1. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hand-washing/HQ00407

2. http://www.ajcn.org/content/91/5/1255.full

3. http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/vitamind

4. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hand-washing/HQ00407

5. http://www.ajcn.org/content/91/5/125

6.http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheet/vitamind

7. Weizman Z, et al, Pedaitrics (205)115:5-9: Effect of a probiotic infant formula on infections in child carre centers-comparison of two probiotic agents.

8. Rennard, et al, Chest October 2000 vol 118 #4, pg 1150-1157: Chicken Soup inhibits neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro.

9. Urashima, et al, Am J of Nutrition, May 2010 91:5,  1255-1260: Randomized trial of Vitamin D supplementation to prevent seasonal influenza A in schoolchildren.

10. Chest, vol. 118, 2000 Drs. B. Rennard, Ertl, Gossman, Robbins and S. I. Rennard.
Store-bought chicken soup (listed in order of presumed effectiveness):
Knorr’s Chicken Flavor Chicken Noodle
Campbell’s Home Cookin’ Chicken Vegetable
Campbell’s Healthy Request Chicken Noodle
Lipton’s Cup-o-soup, Chicken Noodle
Progresso Chicken Noodle.
Other brands, including some of Campbell’s, were less effective.
Here’s the recipe. More work of course, but you can cut the excessive use of salt found in store-bought types:

1 5-to 6-lb stewing hen or baking chicken,
1 package of chicken wings,
3 large onions,
l large sweet potato,
3 parsnips,
2 turnips,
11 to 12 large carrots,
5 to 6 celery stems,
1 bunch of parsley,
salt and pepper to taste.

Cover the chicken with cold water, and bring it to boiling. Add chicken wings, onions, sweet potato, parsnips, turnips and carrots. Boil about 1 1/2 hours, removing fat regularly. Add the parsley and celery. Cook all about 45 minutes longer. Remove the chicken, which is no longer used for the soup. Put the vegetables in a food processor until chopped fine or pass them through a strainer. Add salt and pepper
Enjoy!
Doctors Test Chicken Soup for a Cold – Don’t Laugh Bibliography

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Probiotics Update with Dr. Sheila Kilbane (Pedcast)

The “Let’s Talk Kids” podcast is fortunate to have as our returning guest, Dr. Shelia Kilbane who is an expert in integrative medicine.  She focuses her expertise in this Pedcast on teaching us about the role of  microbial life in maintaining your children’s good health.  You don’t want to miss her perspective on the topic of probiotics. As always, Dr Kilbane is informative, practical, and up to date.  Join us won’t you.

 

Subscribe on iTunes!

Subscribe on iTunes!

 

SmoNotes:

1.    Weizman Z, et al.  Pediatrics (2005)115:5-9.

2.    Isolauri E, Arvola T, Sutas Y, et al.  Probiotics in the management of atopic eczema.  Clin Exp Allergy (2000);30:1604-10.

3.     Isolauri E, Juntunen M, Rautanen T, Sillanaukee P,Koivula T.  A human Lactobacillus strain (Lactobacillus casei sp strain GG) promotes recovery from acute diarrhea in children. (1991) Pediatrics 88:90-7.

4.     Kalliomaki M, Salminen S, Arvilommi H, et al.  Probiotics in primary prevention of atopic disease:  A randomized placebo-controlled trial.  Lancet (2001)357:1076-9

5.     Vanderhoof J, Young R.  Probiotics in Pediatrics.  Pediatrics (2002)109;5:956-8.

6.      Szajewska H, Mrukowicz J.  Probiotics in the Treatment and Prevention of Acute Infectious Diarrhea in Infants and Children:  A Systematic Review of Published Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trials.  J of Ped Gastroenerology and Nutrition (2001)33:S17-S25.

 
*By listening to this pedcast, you are agreeing to Doc Smo’s terms and conditions.

 

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