Tag Archives: trauma

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast – Journal Club #2 with Andrew Brackins MSIV -TBI/Concussion and Fish Oil

Journal Club #2 with Andrew Brackins MSIV

Topic today – Traumatic brain injury or concussion is a significant problem in young adults and children. What do we know about the reasons why some people suffer longer term symptoms? What can we do to mitigate risk going forward? Fish oil is an omega 3 fatty acid that has recently gained attention as a possible therapeutic pre and post head trauma. Let us explore the head injury landscape together in this Journal Club episode.

Enjoy,

Dr. M

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #22 – Michael Gay – An Uncivilized Journey Part 2

My guest this week is Michael Gay. Michael is a therapist in private practice in Boulder, Colorado. He earned his M.A. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling from Naropa University with a focus in Transpersonal Psychology. Michael has worked in the field of counseling for the last 14 years as a guide, therapist, and trainer. He was a Wilderness Therapy guide for 6 years, leading and facilitating in deep transformational work with teens, adults, and families in the mountains and high desert. He has also worked extensively in the field of addiction and recovery. He specializes in work with depression, groups, trauma, PTSD, grief, and families. He currently co-creates with leaders in the field bringing men together for transformational experiences, brotherhood, healing, and empowerment. In addition to his M.A., Michael completed a 3 year training at the Gestalt Institute of the Rockies, and continues to train at the Gestalt Equine Institute.

Michael is a deep thinker. I mean deeeeeep. We dive off of the deep end of the pool discussing men’s health, therapy and living an authentic  balanced life. Discussing the realities of men and their struggles is refreshing in a world of hidden truths.

I hope that enjoy my conversation with Michael,

Dr. M

https://www.michaelgaycounseling.com

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #21 – Traver Boehm – An Uncivilized Journey

What does it mean to be a man in modern times? To be in tune with and feel all aspects of one’s life experiences? To be unapologetic, authentic and safe? To move past trauma and pain? In other words, to be a man uncivilized.
To better understand these questions, I give you the words or Traver Boehm: “Men had to choose between two outdated and broken options….Be the Lone Wolf and die ALONE with a chest full of unexpressed emotions and a wake of broken relationships behind him. A man who thinks the feminine is weakness and weakness is unbearable. He misunderstands that within his weaknesses lie his greatest strengths. Or… Be the Sensitive New Age “Nice Guy” and have a million bestest girlfriends, now living as the wolf in sheep’s clothing. A man who thinks the masculine is terrifying and is forced to deny every aspect of his own manhood. If you are a “Nice Guy”— you are living someone else’s life. But the truth wasn’t in these two options, was it? I knew it. Most men knew it. We just couldn’t find it. And until you have your own back, you can’t truly have anybody else’s. WHAT IF THERE WAS AN OPTION FOR MEN TO BREAK OUT OF THEIR CAGED LIVES AND BECOME FREE?
A Good Man, a Strong Man, a WHOLE MAN.”
This podcast is an exploration of Traver and his thoughts on these topics. He is a man on a mission to help men become better men. He is a thinker, podcaster, writer and so much more.
Enjoy my conversation with Traver Boehm,
Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 12 Issues 10 and 12

SPA Audiocast Newsletter Volume 12 Letters 10 and 12

In issue 10, we look at effort and resilience. We take a look at non nutritive sweeteners and the microbiome. And finally, sugar and the risk of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

In issue 12, we discuss trauma and the epigenetic realities that follow these events. We look at some new research related to type 1 Diabetes following Covid infection as well as the effects that Maternal Gestational Diabetes on newborn offspring.

Enjoy,

Dr. M

From the desk of Doc Smo: Parents, listen before you speak (Article)

 

In the wake of the terrible massacre in Newtown, CT last Friday, parents are groping for the right words to use when they discuss this horrible event with their children.  Everyone is trying to make sense of this tragedy.  Like all of us, the emotions that our kids are feeling are a mixture of fear, anger, grief, sadness, and empathy.   How can we help young people during the upcoming months?  What should parents say about events that they cannot comprehend themselves?

I suggest that listening is more important than talking.  Start by providing opportunities for your children to talk about the events of last week.  If they are school age or older, they have undoubtedly heard something about what happened.   Make sure that what they have heard is accurate and fits with the facts we know. More important, listen to the emotional content they use to describe the events. If anger is the theme, listen and explore that with them without judging or preaching.  If sadness is what your child expresses, find out what else makes him or her sad, and explore that.  Should empathy be what a child feels, help him or her show concern by writing a letter to the families of the slain children or by raising money for these families.

I suspect that most children are feeling fearful and vulnerable, especially when going to school. They are fearful for their own safety as well as for the safety of their parents.  Listen, reassure, reassure, and reassure some more.  After 31 years practicing pediatrics, one of my core beliefs about children is that if you treat children with respect and dignity, most of them will respond with growth.   Acknowledgment, validation and reassurance are the tools we have to respond to our children in situations such as this.  Time, love, acceptance and understanding can heal a lot of hurt; this is true for our children as well as their parents.

 

Some children are traumatized by talk of violence. Should your child react in extreme ways—for example, by becoming excessively fearful—talk to your pediatrician, clergy, and/or teachers:  they can provide comfort, support, and guidance.  Don’t be afraid to ask for help.

 

Readers comments are welcome at:  www.docsmo.com.  Join the discussion.