Obesity

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #34 Stephan Guyenet, PhD – Childhood Obesity Part IV – Neuroscience of Food Choice

This week, I sit down with Dr. Stephan J. Guyenet, a neuroscientist, thinker and educator.  After earning a BS in biochemistry at the University of Virginia, he completed a PhD in neuroscience at the University of Washington, then went on to study the neuroscience of obesity and eating behavior as a postdoctoral fellow.  He has over 12 years of history in the neuroscience research world studying neurodegenerative disease and the neuroscience of body fatness.  His mission is to advance science and public health as a researcher, science consultant, and science communicator.  Publishing a book, The Hungry Brain, in 2017, he laid out the framework for understanding how our brains work with food. It was named one of the best books of the year by Publishers Weekly and called “essential” by the New York Times Book Review.

Finally, he is the founder and director of Red Pen Reviews, which publishes the most informative, consistent, and unbiased popular health and nutrition book reviews available.

This hour long conversation is very stimulating as we dive headlong into the upstream targets of food choice and body outcome.

Enjoy,

Dr. M

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #33 David Allison, PhD – Childhood Obesity Part III

This weeks guest is Dr. David B. Allison. Dr. Allison is the third guest to tackle the topic of childhood obesity for us. He received his Ph.D. from Hofstra University in 1990. He then completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a second post-doctoral fellowship at the NIH-funded New York Obesity Research Center at St. Luke’s/Roosevelt Hospital Center. He became Dean and Provost Professor at the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington in 2017.
He has authored more than 660 scientific publications and received many awards over his distinguished career. Dean Allison has provided regular service to the National Academies, including the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine.
His research interests include obesity and nutrition, quantitative genetics, clinical trials, statistical and research methodology, and research rigor and integrity.
“Dr. Allison coined “It’s about knowing” as the tagline for the School of Public Health Indiana University Bloomington for which serves as Dean, and the extended moto “It’s about knowing. Because conjecture is good, but knowing is better.” He conceived a book by the title “It’s About Knowing” written principally by Susan Brackney and co-authored by Dr. Allison. More information about the book is available here.”
This week we tackle the difficulty of performing meaningful research in the Obesity landscape. This is a conversation primarily about the study process and the difficulties in teasing out the variables.
Enjoy,
Dr. M

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #31 – Dr. Sandra Hassink – Childhood Obesity

This weeks guest is Dr. Sandra Hassink, an expert in pediatric obesity.
Dr. Hassink has spent her career looking into the pathophysiology and social determinants of childhood obesity. Her career began at the Univeristy of Deleware where she studied Chemistry before heading off to Vanderbilt University to study medicine. After completing her training in Pediatrics at St Christopher’s Hospital in Philadelphia, Dr. Hassink began a long trailblazing road to treating childhood obesity, starting a weight management clinic in 1988 at Alfred I. duPont Children’s Hospital in Delaware well before most pediatricians even realized there was an issue to address.
She is now internationally recognized as an expert in childhood obesity prevention, testifying before Congress and serving as chair of the Delaware Governor’s council on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and directing the AAP Institute for Healthy Childhood Weight. She has served as the president of the American Academy of Pediatrics, chaired the AAP Obesity Leadership Workgroup, the AAP Institute for Healthy Childhood Weight Advisory Committee, and the AAP Strategic Planning Committee. Dr.  Hassink is the chair of the Institute for Medicaid Innovation Child and Adolescent Subcommittee and a member of the  National Advisory Board. She authored numerous articles for parents and pediatricians and two books: “Pediatric Obesity: Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment Strategies for Primary Care” and “A Clinical Guide to Pediatric Weight Management.”
In a word, she is a teacher.
Today, we have the privilege of learning.
Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Volume 11 Issue 27 Covid Update #38

Just when you think that the information on SARS2 Covid19 is slowing to a crawl with new discovery, a favorite researcher publishes a truly remarkable bit of scientific discovery. Dr. Alessio Fasano is featured below in Number 6 and his work is really important. A little science heavy but critical for children. There is a take home summary as well. Don’t miss this information.
Quick hits
1) CDC data on adolescent hospitalizations: COVID-19 adolescent hospitalization rates from COVID-NET peaked at 2.1 per 100,000 in early January 2021, declined to 0.6 in mid-March, and rose to 1.3 in April. Among hospitalized adolescents, nearly one third required intensive care unit admission, and 5% required invasive mechanical ventilation; no associated deaths occurred….. Read more at this link: https://www.salisburypediatrics.com/patient-education/dr-magryta-s-newsletter/964-volume-11-letter-27-coronavirus-update-38

Your Children Eating Themselves Sick? (Archived Pedcast)

Many children are literally getting a chronic liver disease from their poor diets. Learn more in today’s pedcast.

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Grandma Was Right, Children Don’t Need Snacks (Archived Pedcast)

Doc Smo here, your pedcast host. Thanks for joining me today. News flash, life expectancy in the US has fallen for the past three years straight. I am sure there are many reasons for this but I am afraid that this fact may not just be a temporary aberration, but a glimpse of things to come in the future? Could it be that your children’s life will be shorter and sicker than the one you are living?  Could the obesity epidemic among American children be teeing up this generation for a world of hurt in the future? I fear so and if you stay with me for a few minutes and I will explain why this is and, more importantly, what you can do today, to protect your children.

 

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Important Reasons to Avoid Feeding Your Children Processed Foods (Pedcast by Sonya Corina Williams)

News flash- the state of nutrition among many American children is bad…very bad. Obesity and metabolic disease are now common in children, largely due to the consumption of an abundance of processed food. And by the way, being obese, having hypertension, or an elevated blood sugar during childhood imparts a good chance of that child having long-term health consequences as you are about to see in today’s pedcast so stay tuned!

Image by H. Ondrejkova Pixabay Images

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