immune

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #68 – John Warner, M.D. – Allergy, Milk and Prevention

This week we sit down with Dr.  John Warner, an Emeritus professor of Pediatrics at the Imperial College of London in the United Kingdom and also at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. We discuss his recent paper entitled: Strategies and Future Opportunities for the Prevention, Diagnosis, and Management of Cow Milk Allergy. Dr. Warner completed his undergraduate medical training in the School of Medicine, University of Sheffield and his initial pediatric experience was at the Children”s Hospital, Sheffield in the United Kingdom. He moved to London as Professor of Pediatrics and Head of Department at Imperial College St Mary’s hospital campus.  He is also Hon Professor of Pediatrics in the University of Cape Town.

In 2008 he became Director of Research for the Women and Children’s Clinical Programme Group, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust (ICHT). He was the lead for pediatrics in both the Biomedical Research Centre in ICHT and the NW London CLAHRC (Collaboration for Applied Health Research and Care) and was President of the Academic Pediatrics Association.

Professor Warner’s research has focused on the early life origins of asthma and related allergic and respiratory disorders.  He has published over 500 papers in scientific journals on these topics.  He was Editor in Chief of the journal Paediatric Allergy and Immunology from 1997-2010 and chairman of the paediatric section of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology for 5 years until 2010.  He was also a member of the Speciality and Training committee of the World Allergy Organisation and a past Trustee of the charity known as The Anaphylaxis Campaign. 

He was a member of the Advisory Committee for Novel Foods and Processes of the Food Standards Agency for 12 years until 2012 and was recognised for his work in food allergy research by the award of an OBE in 2013.

 

Please enjoy my conversation with Professor Warner,

Dr. M

 

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 14 Issue 1

Literature Reviews have been very popular. Thus, 2024 will start with science update.

1) Time restricted eating patterns are known to help physiology and metabolism by initiating a pause in the action of mTOR and muscle synthesis as well as inducing autophagy. Autophagy is critical to the clearance of broken or damaged cells following injury or disease. How does circadian biology play into this reality? From Cell Metabolism: “Circadian disruptions impact nearly all people with Alzheimer’s disease….plus a discussion on water, dehydration and prevention as well as a recipe of the week.
Enjoy,
Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 13 Issue 49

Respiratory Syncytial Virus
RSV is a 150 nanometer RNA virus that comes from a human orthopneumovirus that circulates in the winter primarily. Young children and infants infected with RSV mostly have upper respiratory tract symptoms where a subset develop lower respiratory tract disease known as bronchiolitis with the primary infection. It is the most common reason for hospitalization in infants between 0 and 6 months of age. Bronchiolitis appears as a wheezy, cough centric illness that rarely may progress to increased respiratory effort noted by wheezing, rales (lung crackles – sounds like stepping on leaves), chest wall rib retractions, grunting, fast breathing, nasal flaring and eventually respiratory hypoxia. If it persists, the event can rarely lead to respiratory collapse and death. Annually, 150 children under 5 years of age die from RSV in the US. Most of these children are premature births and have cardiopulmonary disease issues. Term healthy children rarely succumb to RSV in a serious way. A recent study of German infants and children hospitalized with RSV identified these risk factors: age <6 months, birth at 28–37 weeks gestational age, congenital defects, perinatal respiratory and cardiovascular disorders, and various other comorbidities as significant risk factors for ICU admission and death. ( Cai et. al. 2020) plus a mini lit review and a discussion on thanksgiving.
Enjoy
Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 13 Issue 48

Covid 19 Post Mortem Part II
The story of the Standard American Diet and its directional connection to death from Sars2 – Covid.
Post Covid population health data has shown us that humans that chronically consume more meat, sugar, animal products and highly processed foods were associated with more death and morbidity if they contracted early versions of Covid19. The effect of consuming sugar products on mortality was considerable, and obesity has affected increased death rates and reduced recovery rates. (Kamyari et. al. 2021) (Greene et. al. 2021) (Merino et. al. 2021) – also a Recipe of the Week.
Enjoy
Dr. M

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #58 – Mahmoud Ghannoum, Ph. D. – Microbiomes – Bacterial and Fungal

This week’s guest is Professor Mahmoud Ghannoum. For over four decades, Dr. Ghannoum has been exploring a critical but neglected inhabitant of the human body, the fungus. Born and raised in Lebanon, Dr Mahmoud Ghannoum is the current Director of the Center for Medical Mycology at Case Western Reserve University. He began his scientific journey at Loughborough University in England where he studied the fungus candida and its health associated diseases. Coupling this work to his curiosity about the whole area of intestinal microorganisms in the human body, he has become one of the leading researchers in the world in this space.
His discoveries include the knowledge that fungal organisms constitute an essential part of the microbiome. In fact, in 2010, Dr Ghannoum was the first scientist to identify over 100 native species of fungi in the oral cavity and that they are mostly friendly to us. Like with bacteria, there are good fungi as well as bad fungi. And just as it was startling to discover that we need positive bacteria in our guts, most people today are shocked to learn that their health depends on flourishing colonies of helpful fungi. Symbiosis in all things seems to be the flavor of the day and history has proven this to be what we should have always assumed.
He is widely published in top journals as well as being the founder and director of Biohm, a company dedicated to microbiome analysis and management from the perspective of fungal and bacterial communities. He is the author of Total Gut Health. This week, Dr. Ghannoum and I look critically at the microbiome of humans from the well trafficked bacterial road to the less travelled fungal road.
Enjoy,
Dr. M