Tag Archives: vitamin d

Dr. Kilbane on “Winterizing” Your Children (Pedcast)

Integrative pediatrics is all about disease prevention and wellness.  Listen to a conversation with our very own integrative consultant, Dr. Sheila Kilbane, when she tells parents how to reduce their children’s chance of getting sick this winter.

 

SmoNotes:

1. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hand-washing/HQ00407

2. http://www.ajcn.org/content/91/5/1255.full

3. http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/vitamind

4. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hand-washing/HQ00407

5. http://www.ajcn.org/content/91/5/125

6.http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheet/vitamind

7. Weizman Z, et al, Pedaitrics (205)115:5-9: Effect of a probiotic infant formula on infections in child carre centers-comparison of two probiotic agents.

8. Rennard, et al, Chest October 2000 vol 118 #4, pg 1150-1157: Chicken Soup inhibits neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro.

9. Urashima, et al, Am J of Nutrition, May 2010 91:5,  1255-1260: Randomized trial of Vitamin D supplementation to prevent seasonal influenza A in schoolchildren.

10. Chest, vol. 118, 2000 Drs. B. Rennard, Ertl, Gossman, Robbins and S. I. Rennard.
Store-bought chicken soup (listed in order of presumed effectiveness):
Knorr’s Chicken Flavor Chicken Noodle
Campbell’s Home Cookin’ Chicken Vegetable
Campbell’s Healthy Request Chicken Noodle
Lipton’s Cup-o-soup, Chicken Noodle
Progresso Chicken Noodle.
Other brands, including some of Campbell’s, were less effective.
Here’s the recipe. More work of course, but you can cut the excessive use of salt found in store-bought types:

1 5-to 6-lb stewing hen or baking chicken,
1 package of chicken wings,
3 large onions,
l large sweet potato,
3 parsnips,
2 turnips,
11 to 12 large carrots,
5 to 6 celery stems,
1 bunch of parsley,
salt and pepper to taste.

Cover the chicken with cold water, and bring it to boiling. Add chicken wings, onions, sweet potato, parsnips, turnips and carrots. Boil about 1 1/2 hours, removing fat regularly. Add the parsley and celery. Cook all about 45 minutes longer. Remove the chicken, which is no longer used for the soup. Put the vegetables in a food processor until chopped fine or pass them through a strainer. Add salt and pepper
Enjoy!
Doctors Test Chicken Soup for a Cold – Don’t Laugh Bibliography

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Grandma, Cod Liver Oil, and the 2011 News Regarding Vitamin D (Pedcast)

Recently, a lot of attention has been paid by the medical community to the role of Vitamin D to maintaining good health.  Dr. Smolen discusses this important topic and gives some recommendations to make sure your infants, children, and teens are both bone healthy and well supplied with Vitamin D.

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Milk Transition-When, Why, and How (Pedcast)

 

 

Transcript: “Milk Transition, When, Why, and How”

 

Transcript:

Welcome to another edition of DocSmo.com

 

Thanks for joining me today, I am your host, Dr. Paul Smolen.

 

Frequently asked question by parents about the composition of milk and can they stop buying formula.

 

Parents anxious to change to whole milk because of convenience and cost.

 

To understand, need to know some immunology and chemistry.

 

While we are at it, let me give you some practical advice about making the change from baby milk to big people milk.

 

How do breast milk, cows milk based formula, and whole cow milk differ? To answer lets detour down science lane.

 

Compared with breast milk and formula, whole cows milk has less sugar…not as tasty…naturally some resistance by junior.

 

Compared with breast milk  and formula, whole cows milk has more protein and thicker, less soluble proteins…more curds…slower transit, more fermentation into cheese , therefore harder stools for little Janie or Johnny.

 

Compared with breast milk, whole cows milk has proteins that can frequently provoke allergic reactions, especially children under 6 months.  The allergic reaction in the gut can cause bleeding gut wall.  Subsequent anemia can develop and anemia in first year really bad associated with various serious health issues. That’s why we don’t give whole cow’s milk  to babies under 1 year!

 

Compared with breast milk and formula, whole cow’s milk has almost no iron, which as you know, is a vital nutrient for children.

 

Compared with breast milk and formula, whole cow’s milk is missing some fats and vitamins that others have but solids should make up for this.

 

When milk is the whole ballgame, early infancy, we need to get it right.

 

In the second year, not as important because of so many other nutrients and much of brain development has already occurred.

 

The bottom line is that whole cow’s milk is not appropriate food for infants( children in the first year).  I repeat, whole cow’s milk is not appropriate food for infants.

 

 

 

Time for a call in question from Boris: ”What do the experts recommend for my little comrades?”

 

Their recommendation is a strong one: breast milk or formula until at least one year.  Remember, those Doc Smo pearls, “Breast is best” and “Longer means stronger” and “Mom is de-bomb.”

But all good things come to an end. At some point must give up the breast.

 

When you do transition, make sure you go to whole milk, which is about 5% fat.  Nothing leaner; not 2%, not skim.  This is because your child’s brain is made of fat and consumption of fat is essential for proper brain development.

 

Most parents transition to whole cow’s milk at around 1 year but not all.  Many cultures breast feed long into childhood.  Nothing wrong with that. Cultures evolve and change.  50 years ago almost no one breastfed in the US. Science is overwhelming that breast milk is the best food for babies.  Maybe we are headed for a cultural change, longer breast-feeding with a delay in weaning?

 

What kind of problems do parents experience when transitioning to whole cow’s milk?

 

1. Not as sweet.  Baby may refuse since whole cow’s milk is not as sweet as breast milk or formula. I recommend you mix the whole cow’s milk with formula or breast milk and slowly wean your child away from the sweet taste.

 

2. More protein and different proteins can mean more constipation… The savvy parent is ready for this with more fruit, fiber, and water.

 

3. Less iron can also spell trouble. Again, the savvy parent is ready with iron rich foods. Meats (any are fine), infant cereals, green leafy veg, and dark purple fruits, raisins, plums, prunes.  These are foods all of which are rich in iron.

 

4. Whole cow’s milk like breast milk and formula may not supply your child with enough Vitamin D.  Vitamin D, 400 IU needs to be continued throughout childhood.

 

So let’s sum it all up.

 

Whole cow’s milk is not appropriate food first year, pure and simple.

 

Breast is preferred, but when it is not available, infant formula is the only substitue in the first year of life.

 

Most parents transition their children to whole cow’s milk at around 1 year to whole. Experts warn against using not leaner mil in the second year because babies at that age need a lot of fat in order to grow properly.  Whole cow’s milk is a good food for children in the second year of life but should be given along with a good variety of other nutrients given.  Milk alone is not a complete food.

 

Problems that parents may encounter when transitioning to cow’s milk are resistance to taste because not as sweet and constipation because of protein content and composition is different. To counter these problems, I recommend you reduce the sugar content slowly and make sure infant has high fiber intake during transition.

 

Many children are tired of milk from their first year. Be persistent with milk since for many children, this is an acquired taste. I feel that your child’s choices of drink during childhood should be either milk or water.  Stay away from juices and other sweetened beverages, even diluted.

 

Vitamin D supplement need to continue and limit milk intake to no more than 24 ounces per day.  And those bottles, they need to go at your child’s first birthday.

 

That’s it for this week from studio 1E, you know, the first child’s bedroom on the east side of the house.

 

Thanks for joining me.

 

Comments are welcome as always.

 

Get new content iTunes, Facebook, or my website DocSmo.com

 

Dr Paul Smolen, hoping your child’s transition to milk goes smooth as silk.

 

Until next time.

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Going Public with Your Newborn, How and When! (Pedcast)

Doc Smo here. Thanks for joining me today. One of the most frequently asked questions that I get in the newborn nursery is, “When can I take my newborn to church, when can I take my baby to the mall, and when can I have my friends over?” Well you will find varying opinions on this subject and the truth is that there is no science behind any of this. I don’t believe that there is a right answer to this question. Different cultures have developed different norms. For instance in traditional Greek society, I am told that babies are isolated from public exposure for the first 60 days of life and in traditional Japanese culture, the isolation period is one year. To my knowledge, the Academy of Pediatrics does not have policy regarding this subject so I thought we would take a little time to explore the subject of when should newborns venture into public places. Continue reading