Tag Archives: cow’s milk

Dr. Kilbane conducts Mooo U (Pedcast)

Welcome to an exciting edition of Docsmo.com, where parents can get a free pediatric education on their schedule about the subjects that interest them.  From the diapers to the diploma, if it involves children, we take it on here.  Today I am honored to have as a returning guest, Dr. Sheila Kilbane, an integrative pediatrician with loads of education, knowledge and experience. Today, Dr. Kilbane and I are going to take on a longtime simmering controversy in pediatrics, that of the health value of cows milk.  Yes, controversy…you heard me right. Not everyone agrees that consuming dairy products is healthy, especially many integrative pediatricians.  Since we have one of the best in the world with us today, I thought we would get her thoughts on cows milk as it relates to the health of children.  Welcome Dr. Sheila Kilbane. Are you ready to enlighten my listeners and me about the great cows milk controversy?


SK: Banter


Dr. Kilbane, before we get into the nitty-gritty of the milk controversy, can you run though the anatomy of milk and get our listeners familiar with the terminology that surrounds milk, please? What exactly is milk made of?


SK:  Milk broken down by components

  •  Lactose
  • Casein Whey
  • Calcium
  • Phosphorus
  • Vitamin D
  • Saturated fat
  • Pasteurized

(Explains above briefly)


Section 1- Points of Agreement?

DocSmo: Dr. Kilbane, maybe we should begin our discussion of cow’s milk with a list of things I think the pediatric medical establishment agree on.  Feel free to comment on these points as I go through them, won’t you?

  • Breast milk is the best nutrient for babies in the first year of life.
  • Unmodified, unchanged cow’s milk–you know, the kind we buy in the store and put on cereal–given to an infant in the first year of life is a bad idea. Iron deficiency anemia, milk allergy, mineral content imbalances that can lead to seizures are all reasons why we shouldn’t give any unmodified milk to infants. Remember, infants are babies under a year of age.
  • In older children, raw, unpasteurized cow’s milk can cause infections such as Listeria, TB, Campylobacter, E Coli, Salmonella, Brucella. Sounds bad, doesn’t it!

SK: Actually, the risks of drinking unpasteurized cow’s milk are very low. There have been very few cases of sickness.  

(195 hospital trips, and 2 deaths between 1998-2009–CDC)

 


  • Full fat foods are needed for 1-2 year olds, and that includes whole cow’s milk if milk is in the child’s diet

  SK: I don’t recommend dairy after an infant’s first birthday.  Other fat sources …

 


  • Leaner cow’s milk is preferred after 2 years of age. AAP recommends 2 servings of lean cow’s milk daily. That’s skim, or other low fat milks.

SK: Dairy is not the healthiest food source of calcium…


  • There are many babies who are allergic to milk, especially in the first 6 months of life, probably in the 5% range.      Cows milk allergy generally disappears by 2 years of age and is unusual in children over two years of age.

SK: sensitivity studies. Dramatic improvement off dairy. Examples


  • Lactose intolerance is rare in babies

 

SK: Lacto free milk not appropriate for milk allergic children…


  • Experts say Fortified Vitamin D milk is a good source of vitamin D in children.

 SK: Too much milk for too little vitamin D


Section 2-Points of Controversy

OK, Dr. Kilbane, enough for the things we can agree on, now let’s get into the controversies:

  • According to many experts, including the USDA and the American Academy of Pediatrics, cow’s milk is an essential nutrient for children, providing nutrients that are difficult to get elsewhere (those nutrients being essential fats, calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D).

SK: Strongly disagree.  Saturated fat, difficult to get calcium, phosphors too high. “Company that fats keep.”…


  • Cow’s milk consumption promotes cardiovascular disease, diabetes, allergy, and cancer

SK: rats with the casein studies…


 

 

  • Cows milk consumption prevents osteoporosis in adults

SK: cite studies


  • Organic milk is better than non organic.-

 

SK: organic or nonorganic…cows pregnant all the time. Hormones high- promote cancers… 


Conclusion:

Dr. Kilbane, you always make us think out of the box when you bring your wisdom. I now can see why the most famous pediatrician of the twentieth century, Dr. Benjamin Spock, felt that drinking cow’s milk in childhood was destructive to children. It seems like time may be proving him correct. As I started to do my research for this podcast, I was actually surprised at how little evidence there is to justify the strong message that children must drink milk. It seems that this recommendation is justified more out of tradition than science. I suspect that the truth about milk lies somewhere between the two extreme positions you hear when you read about this subject…some claiming that milk causes most of the degenerative diseases in the Western world versus others insisting that milk is an absolutely essential nutrient to normal growth. Which type and how much dairy is healthiest for children only time will tell. Hopefully, we are getting closer to that answer.

I want to thank Dr. Sheila Kilbane for joining us today and bringing her perspective to my listeners and me. She is one of my favorite guests. Make sure you take a few minutes to check out her website at http://www.sheilakilbane.com/ and listen to the other podcasts we have made together that are posted on https://www.docsmo.com. They are full of Kilbane wisdom. This is Dr. Paul Smolen, hoping today’s pedcast helped make your decision whether to feed your children cow’s milk as smooth as silk.  Until next time.


Smo Notes:

1.

 http://www.pcrm.org/health/cancer-resources/ask/ask-the-expert-dairy-products

Baby’s First Solid Food: When and How (Pedcast)

This Pedcast is a must listen for parents with young infants.  Dr Smolen presents a referenced discussion of how and when complimentary foods (i.e. solids) should be introduced into your child’s diet.  Kick back and find out what the experts are thinking is best for your infant when it comes to infant nutrition.

 

SmoNotes:

1. Selected Complementary Feeding Practices and Their Association With Maternal Education

2. Solid foods: How to get your baby started – MayoClinic.com

3. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition – How did babies grow 100 years ago[quest]

 

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Milk Transition-When, Why, and How (Pedcast)

 

 

Transcript: “Milk Transition, When, Why, and How”

 

Transcript:

Welcome to another edition of DocSmo.com

 

Thanks for joining me today, I am your host, Dr. Paul Smolen.

 

Frequently asked question by parents about the composition of milk and can they stop buying formula.

 

Parents anxious to change to whole milk because of convenience and cost.

 

To understand, need to know some immunology and chemistry.

 

While we are at it, let me give you some practical advice about making the change from baby milk to big people milk.

 

How do breast milk, cows milk based formula, and whole cow milk differ? To answer lets detour down science lane.

 

Compared with breast milk and formula, whole cows milk has less sugar…not as tasty…naturally some resistance by junior.

 

Compared with breast milk  and formula, whole cows milk has more protein and thicker, less soluble proteins…more curds…slower transit, more fermentation into cheese , therefore harder stools for little Janie or Johnny.

 

Compared with breast milk, whole cows milk has proteins that can frequently provoke allergic reactions, especially children under 6 months.  The allergic reaction in the gut can cause bleeding gut wall.  Subsequent anemia can develop and anemia in first year really bad associated with various serious health issues. That’s why we don’t give whole cow’s milk  to babies under 1 year!

 

Compared with breast milk and formula, whole cow’s milk has almost no iron, which as you know, is a vital nutrient for children.

 

Compared with breast milk and formula, whole cow’s milk is missing some fats and vitamins that others have but solids should make up for this.

 

When milk is the whole ballgame, early infancy, we need to get it right.

 

In the second year, not as important because of so many other nutrients and much of brain development has already occurred.

 

The bottom line is that whole cow’s milk is not appropriate food for infants( children in the first year).  I repeat, whole cow’s milk is not appropriate food for infants.

 

 

 

Time for a call in question from Boris: ”What do the experts recommend for my little comrades?”

 

Their recommendation is a strong one: breast milk or formula until at least one year.  Remember, those Doc Smo pearls, “Breast is best” and “Longer means stronger” and “Mom is de-bomb.”

But all good things come to an end. At some point must give up the breast.

 

When you do transition, make sure you go to whole milk, which is about 5% fat.  Nothing leaner; not 2%, not skim.  This is because your child’s brain is made of fat and consumption of fat is essential for proper brain development.

 

Most parents transition to whole cow’s milk at around 1 year but not all.  Many cultures breast feed long into childhood.  Nothing wrong with that. Cultures evolve and change.  50 years ago almost no one breastfed in the US. Science is overwhelming that breast milk is the best food for babies.  Maybe we are headed for a cultural change, longer breast-feeding with a delay in weaning?

 

What kind of problems do parents experience when transitioning to whole cow’s milk?

 

1. Not as sweet.  Baby may refuse since whole cow’s milk is not as sweet as breast milk or formula. I recommend you mix the whole cow’s milk with formula or breast milk and slowly wean your child away from the sweet taste.

 

2. More protein and different proteins can mean more constipation… The savvy parent is ready for this with more fruit, fiber, and water.

 

3. Less iron can also spell trouble. Again, the savvy parent is ready with iron rich foods. Meats (any are fine), infant cereals, green leafy veg, and dark purple fruits, raisins, plums, prunes.  These are foods all of which are rich in iron.

 

4. Whole cow’s milk like breast milk and formula may not supply your child with enough Vitamin D.  Vitamin D, 400 IU needs to be continued throughout childhood.

 

So let’s sum it all up.

 

Whole cow’s milk is not appropriate food first year, pure and simple.

 

Breast is preferred, but when it is not available, infant formula is the only substitue in the first year of life.

 

Most parents transition their children to whole cow’s milk at around 1 year to whole. Experts warn against using not leaner mil in the second year because babies at that age need a lot of fat in order to grow properly.  Whole cow’s milk is a good food for children in the second year of life but should be given along with a good variety of other nutrients given.  Milk alone is not a complete food.

 

Problems that parents may encounter when transitioning to cow’s milk are resistance to taste because not as sweet and constipation because of protein content and composition is different. To counter these problems, I recommend you reduce the sugar content slowly and make sure infant has high fiber intake during transition.

 

Many children are tired of milk from their first year. Be persistent with milk since for many children, this is an acquired taste. I feel that your child’s choices of drink during childhood should be either milk or water.  Stay away from juices and other sweetened beverages, even diluted.

 

Vitamin D supplement need to continue and limit milk intake to no more than 24 ounces per day.  And those bottles, they need to go at your child’s first birthday.

 

That’s it for this week from studio 1E, you know, the first child’s bedroom on the east side of the house.

 

Thanks for joining me.

 

Comments are welcome as always.

 

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Dr Paul Smolen, hoping your child’s transition to milk goes smooth as silk.

 

Until next time.

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