Tag Archives: nutrients

From the desk of Doc Smo: Dietary supplements improve health? (Article)

The news had not been kind to the vitamin and nutrition supplement makes recently.  Many have heard of the conclusion of the Iowa Women’s Health study which found that supplemental vitamins and iron were not only not helpful to the health of older women, but they may actually be detrimental. Death from all causes were higher among the women who took supplements that those that did not. large epidemiologic studies have found that eating the whole fruits and vegetables does improve health.

On the heels of this study comes on in the British medical journal that found eating fish 2 or more times a week reduced ones chances of stroke but taking fish oil supplement did not show the same benefit. Once again, supplements seem not to be effective in preventing disease whereas the natural whole food is effective.  I think the message is clear from these studies: nutrients work in concert with one another, probably optimally in the balance that are found in whole food. Nutrients work in concert with one another, much like a symphony of musicians. For an orchestra to sound right, all the instruments need to be in balance, playing together in synchrony. Our cells are much the same, needing a steady diet of all the nutrients that are found in the whole foods that we know are essential to health. Improving your child’s health by finding just the right mixture of vitamins and nutrients is probably not going to happen.  Providing them with  a wide variety of whole foods and limiting or eliminating entirely processed foods is your child’s ticket to good health, now and in the future.

Your comments are welcome at www.docsmo.com.  Until next time.

 

Smo notes:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21987192

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/10/11/more-evidence-against-vitamin-use/

http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1105975

http://www.bmj.com/content/345/bmj.e6698

“Food Decisions” with Dr. Kilbane (Pedcast)

In today’s podcast, Dr. Sheila Kilbane returns to bring us some of her insights regarding nutrition that can help parents make food decisions for their children.  This is one of those podcasts you don’t want to miss.   In today’s pedcast, you will hear a  discussion of  organic versus non organic food, which is best for your family? Dr. Kilbane will help you make your family’s food decisions!


Subscribe on iTunes!

Smo Notes:

1. http://www.ewg.org/foodnews/

2.  Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Urinary Metabolites of Organophosphate Pesticides
Maryse F. Bouchard, David C. Bellinger, Robert O. Wright and Marc G. Weisskopf.   

        Pediatrics; originally published online May 17, 2010; 

3.  Organic Diets Significantly Lower Children’s Dietary Exposure to Organophosphorus Pesticides

        Chensheng Lu, Kathryn Toepel, Rene Irish, Richard A Fenski, Dana B Barr, & Roberto Bravo.


Environ Health Perspect. 2006 February; 114(2): 260–263.

        Published online 2005 September 1. doi:  10.1289/ehp.8418

4.  Pesticides

  • Bernard Weiss,
  • Sherlita Amler,
  • and Robert W. Amler

Pediatrics 2004; 113:Supplement 3 

 

By listening to this pedcast, you are agreeing to DocSmo’s terms and conditions.
© All Right’s Reserved.

Milk Transition-When, Why, and How (Pedcast)

 

 

Transcript: “Milk Transition, When, Why, and How”

 

Transcript:

Welcome to another edition of DocSmo.com

 

Thanks for joining me today, I am your host, Dr. Paul Smolen.

 

Frequently asked question by parents about the composition of milk and can they stop buying formula.

 

Parents anxious to change to whole milk because of convenience and cost.

 

To understand, need to know some immunology and chemistry.

 

While we are at it, let me give you some practical advice about making the change from baby milk to big people milk.

 

How do breast milk, cows milk based formula, and whole cow milk differ? To answer lets detour down science lane.

 

Compared with breast milk and formula, whole cows milk has less sugar…not as tasty…naturally some resistance by junior.

 

Compared with breast milk  and formula, whole cows milk has more protein and thicker, less soluble proteins…more curds…slower transit, more fermentation into cheese , therefore harder stools for little Janie or Johnny.

 

Compared with breast milk, whole cows milk has proteins that can frequently provoke allergic reactions, especially children under 6 months.  The allergic reaction in the gut can cause bleeding gut wall.  Subsequent anemia can develop and anemia in first year really bad associated with various serious health issues. That’s why we don’t give whole cow’s milk  to babies under 1 year!

 

Compared with breast milk and formula, whole cow’s milk has almost no iron, which as you know, is a vital nutrient for children.

 

Compared with breast milk and formula, whole cow’s milk is missing some fats and vitamins that others have but solids should make up for this.

 

When milk is the whole ballgame, early infancy, we need to get it right.

 

In the second year, not as important because of so many other nutrients and much of brain development has already occurred.

 

The bottom line is that whole cow’s milk is not appropriate food for infants( children in the first year).  I repeat, whole cow’s milk is not appropriate food for infants.

 

 

 

Time for a call in question from Boris: ”What do the experts recommend for my little comrades?”

 

Their recommendation is a strong one: breast milk or formula until at least one year.  Remember, those Doc Smo pearls, “Breast is best” and “Longer means stronger” and “Mom is de-bomb.”

But all good things come to an end. At some point must give up the breast.

 

When you do transition, make sure you go to whole milk, which is about 5% fat.  Nothing leaner; not 2%, not skim.  This is because your child’s brain is made of fat and consumption of fat is essential for proper brain development.

 

Most parents transition to whole cow’s milk at around 1 year but not all.  Many cultures breast feed long into childhood.  Nothing wrong with that. Cultures evolve and change.  50 years ago almost no one breastfed in the US. Science is overwhelming that breast milk is the best food for babies.  Maybe we are headed for a cultural change, longer breast-feeding with a delay in weaning?

 

What kind of problems do parents experience when transitioning to whole cow’s milk?

 

1. Not as sweet.  Baby may refuse since whole cow’s milk is not as sweet as breast milk or formula. I recommend you mix the whole cow’s milk with formula or breast milk and slowly wean your child away from the sweet taste.

 

2. More protein and different proteins can mean more constipation… The savvy parent is ready for this with more fruit, fiber, and water.

 

3. Less iron can also spell trouble. Again, the savvy parent is ready with iron rich foods. Meats (any are fine), infant cereals, green leafy veg, and dark purple fruits, raisins, plums, prunes.  These are foods all of which are rich in iron.

 

4. Whole cow’s milk like breast milk and formula may not supply your child with enough Vitamin D.  Vitamin D, 400 IU needs to be continued throughout childhood.

 

So let’s sum it all up.

 

Whole cow’s milk is not appropriate food first year, pure and simple.

 

Breast is preferred, but when it is not available, infant formula is the only substitue in the first year of life.

 

Most parents transition their children to whole cow’s milk at around 1 year to whole. Experts warn against using not leaner mil in the second year because babies at that age need a lot of fat in order to grow properly.  Whole cow’s milk is a good food for children in the second year of life but should be given along with a good variety of other nutrients given.  Milk alone is not a complete food.

 

Problems that parents may encounter when transitioning to cow’s milk are resistance to taste because not as sweet and constipation because of protein content and composition is different. To counter these problems, I recommend you reduce the sugar content slowly and make sure infant has high fiber intake during transition.

 

Many children are tired of milk from their first year. Be persistent with milk since for many children, this is an acquired taste. I feel that your child’s choices of drink during childhood should be either milk or water.  Stay away from juices and other sweetened beverages, even diluted.

 

Vitamin D supplement need to continue and limit milk intake to no more than 24 ounces per day.  And those bottles, they need to go at your child’s first birthday.

 

That’s it for this week from studio 1E, you know, the first child’s bedroom on the east side of the house.

 

Thanks for joining me.

 

Comments are welcome as always.

 

Get new content iTunes, Facebook, or my website DocSmo.com

 

Dr Paul Smolen, hoping your child’s transition to milk goes smooth as silk.

 

Until next time.

Subscribe on iTunes!
Subscribe on iTunes!

*By listening to this pedcast, you are agreeing to Doc Smo’s terms and conditions.

All Rights Reserved