Safety

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #21 – Traver Boehm – An Uncivilized Journey

What does it mean to be a man in modern times? To be in tune with and feel all aspects of one’s life experiences? To be unapologetic, authentic and safe? To move past trauma and pain? In other words, to be a man uncivilized.
To better understand these questions, I give you the words or Traver Boehm: “Men had to choose between two outdated and broken options….Be the Lone Wolf and die ALONE with a chest full of unexpressed emotions and a wake of broken relationships behind him. A man who thinks the feminine is weakness and weakness is unbearable. He misunderstands that within his weaknesses lie his greatest strengths. Or… Be the Sensitive New Age “Nice Guy” and have a million bestest girlfriends, now living as the wolf in sheep’s clothing. A man who thinks the masculine is terrifying and is forced to deny every aspect of his own manhood. If you are a “Nice Guy”— you are living someone else’s life. But the truth wasn’t in these two options, was it? I knew it. Most men knew it. We just couldn’t find it. And until you have your own back, you can’t truly have anybody else’s. WHAT IF THERE WAS AN OPTION FOR MEN TO BREAK OUT OF THEIR CAGED LIVES AND BECOME FREE?
A Good Man, a Strong Man, a WHOLE MAN.”
This podcast is an exploration of Traver and his thoughts on these topics. He is a man on a mission to help men become better men. He is a thinker, podcaster, writer and so much more.
Enjoy my conversation with Traver Boehm,
Dr. M

Injury Prevention for Little People (Archived Pedcast)

Practical advice for parents with toddlers. Keeping them safe is a full-time job.! Hopefully these tips will make your job a little easier.

Image by Pixabay

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Swimming, A Basic Life Skill All Children Should Know (Archived Pedcast)

Swimming lessons are a crucial for every child’s safety–drowning is one of the leading causes of death for children. As parents, you can help protect your children and lower the number of needless drownings by teaching them water safety skills. In this pedcast, Doc Smo emphasizes the importance of child swim lessons and gives parents some practical advice about teaching their children to swim.

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Motors and Kids-A Bad Mix (Archived Pedcast)

Introduction

You can imagine in 34  years of practice, I have witnessed a lot of events, many terrifying and tragic for the children involved. I was reminded of one of those events recently when I was reading an article about ATVs or All Terrain Vehicles. Remember, I live in the south where ATVs and dirt bikes are popular in areas where there is a lot of open space. Many of my patients ride these vehicles with their very powerful engines. In my mind, powerful motors and children are a very bad mix. More on that in a few minutes. Continue reading

A True Trampoline Nightmare (Archived Pedcast)

 

Topic Introduction

Today I’m going to tell you about an interesting experience I had a few weeks ago when I was doing a check up in the office. The patient and his mother was there, the child being about 10 years old. The subject of trampolines came up (as it always does in my checkups with older children), and I was giving this young man my usual warning about not doing flips on trampoline. I never want to see a child have a serious head or neck injury from a trampoline accident, or any other activity for that matter. While I was warning this child not to do flips on a trampoline because the risk of a serious neck injury, this child’s mom got a really pained look on her face. I stopped the conversation and asked her if anything was wrong, and she proceeded to tell me what happened to her when she was 12 years old… in her backyard, jumping on a trampoline. Continue reading

Motors and Kids, a Bad Mix (Pedcast)

You can imagine in 33  years of practice, I have witnessed a lot of events, many terrifying and tragic for the children involved. I was reminded of one of those events recently when I was reading an article about ATVs or All Terrain Vehicles. Remember, I live in the south where ATVs and dirt bikes are popular in areas where there is a lot of open space. Many of my patients ride these vehicles with their very powerful engines. In my mind, powerful motors and children are a very bad mix. More on that in a few minutes. Continue reading

Hearing Loss (Pedcast)

Good evening, and welcome to another addition of DocSmo.com, the home of Portable, Practical, Pedcasts dedicated to parents and children. Today we’re going to take on a topic that probably has not been on your radar: the problem of acquired hearing loss in children. There are risks to your children’s hearing in everyday life, and I feel that parents need to know the basics about sound, noise, and hearing loss in order to protect their children during childhood. So, let’s take the plunge and find out more, shall we?

First, a little trip down what I call Science Lane. We’re gonna do a little basic science about noise and sound and how it’s measured. Sound can be measured in two ways: first in terms of volume, how loud the sound is. This we measure with units called decibels. This is a logarithmic scale, so 100 decibels is a LOT louder than 50 decibels. The threshold of human hearing is about 15 dB…very quiet. And we begin to get into the damage zone for a child’s hearing at about 80 dB, certainly above 100 dB. So, that’s volume. The second way we measure sound is in terms of the frequency of the sound. Speech is a low frequency sound, and certain musical instruments like the flute produce high-frequency sounds. Speaking softly is a low decibel, low frequency sound, whereas listening to a flute is a high volume, high frequency sound. Got it?

The most common hearing loss that pediatricians see in children comes along with cold and ear infections. This is a low-frequency sound loss and fortunately is temporary until the child’s ear infection clears up. As we age, we lose our hearing very slowly. Older people and those exposed to a lot of noise tend to lose high-frequency hearing first. If you don’t remember anything else from this lesson on hearing, I want you to remember this: noise exposure that can damage hearing comes in two forms, first being very brief but very loud noises like shooting a gun, the second type being moderately loud noises, in the range of  80 decibels and higher, that go on for long periods of time. Either of these types of noise exposures can eventually lead to hearing loss. More on this in a minute.

So, as I said before, I want to make you aware that noise can damage your children’s hearing. I want you to do everything you can to protect your kids during childhood. This is important. They may not get the hearing loss until they are adults, but it’s still very important to their overall health and well-being. Now, the number one cause of hearing loss in United States is shooting guns such as shotguns and handguns and yes, children do this as well or they are around when this is being done. Additionally, few people seem to know that power tools like nail guns can also permanently cause hearing loss. These devices produce extremely loud noise, in the 120-140 decibel range, but the noise is so brief, our brains can’t perceive just how damaging this kind of noise can be.

And here are some other kinds of loud noises that have the potential to damage your child’s hearing: lawnmowers–a lot of kids run lawnmowers, and use hairdryers, and those teenage girls love t0 dry their hair every day, sometimes multiple times a day, and certain types of musical instruments like in a very loud wind instruments, and recorded music–especially when delivered with their ear bud devices very close to a child’s eardrum, and motorcycles and farm equipment–All these things have the potential to damage your child’s hearing. I think you should insist that your children wear hearing protection when they are around any of these noise generators and limit their exposure. You need to insist on it. You are the adult in the room!

“Hearing protection around lawnmowers and hairdryers and musical instruments Doc Smo, did I really just hear you say that?” Yes, I really just said that, and I also want you to teach your kids the “warning signs” that sound is too loud for their ears, the number one signal being that the sound hurts when you first start listening to it. We’ve all had that experience of getting in the car the radio really loud and it hurts when you first start listening. That level of sound is damaging. Signal one, the sound hurts initially. The second sign is to hear ringing after noise exposure, this almost always means that there’s been some damage to one’s hearing.

So, to summarize, I want you to be aware that either very loud brief noises repeatedly or moderately loud noise over a long period time can damage your children’s hearing. I want you to try to protect them with some kind of hearing protection, and that’s especially important if they cut the grass (95 db), dry their hair with an electric dryer (85-90 db), shoot weapons (140-170 db), are around motorcycles and loud engines (95 db), as well as any other situation that you think might warrant protecting their precious hearing. Let me tell you it’s much easier to keep your kids from losing their hearing than it is to get their hearing back after they have lost it. That’s true for parents as well. Make sure you set a good example for them, won’t you?

This is Doc Smo, thanking you for joining me and hoping you enjoyed my little chatter, about a subject that really matters. Until next time.

Smo Notes:

1. http://www.kessler-rehab.com/company/newsroom/Tips-on-Preventing-Hearing-Loss.aspx

2. http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Newsroom/News-Releases/1982/CPSC-Cautions-Hair-Dryer-Owners/

3. http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/03/25/what-causes-hearing-loss/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

4. http://www.nytimes.com/1987/10/10/style/consumer-saturday-hair-dryer-safety-standards.html