Tag Archives: Pediatrics

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 12 Issue 42

Literature review
1) Looking for a new sweetener that is natural and less toxic to your body? Usher in Allulose which is the enantiomer of fructose, is much less sweet to taste and does not spike blood glucose or insulin levels. In the British Medical Journal we find: “This is the largest study assessing the effects of D-allulose in Westerners demonstrating an early dose-dependent reduction in plasma glucose and insulin levels as well as decreased postprandial glucose and insulin excursion in subjects without DM. These pilot observations set the basis for large-scale investigations to support the anti-DM effects of D-allulose.” (Franchi et. al. 2021)…..
Enjoy,
Dr. M

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #32 David Katz, MD – Childhood Obesity Part II

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #32 – David Katz, MD – Childhood Obesity Part II
David L. Katz, MD, MPH is a specialist in Preventive Medicine and Lifestyle Medicine, with particular expertise in nutrition.
He earned his BA at Dartmouth College (1984); his MD at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (1988); and his MPH from the Yale University School of Public Health (1993). He completed sequential residency training and board certification in Internal Medicine (1991) and Preventive Medicine/Public Health (1993). Katz is the founder and former director of Yale University’s Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center (1998-2019); Past President of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine; President and Founder of the non-profit True Health Initiative; and Founder and CEO of Diet ID, Inc. The recipient of numerous awards for teaching, writing, and contributions to public health, Katz was a 2019 James Beard Foundation Award nominee in health journalism, has been a widely supported nominee for the position of U.S. Surgeon General, and has received three honorary doctorates. Katz has served as a nutrition columnist for O, the Oprah Magazine; an on-air contributor for ABC News/Good Morning America, and with appearances on most major news programs and contributions to most major magazines and leading newspapers, including OpEds in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal.
His most recent book, How to Eat, co-authored with Mark Bittman, is a 2021 IACP Awards finalist and is worth your time. I have had the pleasure of hearing him speak many times over the years and he is an amazing orator and I am blessed to have this hour with him.
Enjoy,
Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 12 Issue 41

Coronavirus Update #71 A look at the next pandemic

From a recent article, we see a 10 point series of mitigation measures for a future pandemic based on rational thought: “A more realistic public health approach is to adjust current mitigation goals to be more data-driven and to minimize unintended harms associated with unfocused or ineffective control efforts.”
a) Accelerate vaccinations, b) ease restrictions as fast as possible based on science, c) emphasize education and harm reduction, d) Encourage outdoor activity, e) reopen schools, f) avoid lockdowns, g) deemphasize ineffective mitigation measures, h) reassess testing, i) expand treatment and prophylaxis, j) prepare for future pandemics.
And more…
Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 12 Issue 40

Dr. Katz – “Human offspring come into this world much like the young of all other mammals, and like all the others, within minutes of our arrival, we are hungry. Food figures prominently in our lives ever after, but never is it more important than in childhood, when it serves as the literal construction material of those growing bodies and brains. The initial food choice for human babies should be self-evident, as it is for all other baby mammals: the milk of their mothers. The provision of that milk is among the defining characteristics of the mammalian class; it is part of what makes us what we are….

Also, we discuss marijuana and vaping as well as new work by Derek Sivers.

Enjoy,

Dr. M

Dr. M’s Women and Children First Podcast #31 – Dr. Sandra Hassink – Childhood Obesity

This weeks guest is Dr. Sandra Hassink, an expert in pediatric obesity.
Dr. Hassink has spent her career looking into the pathophysiology and social determinants of childhood obesity. Her career began at the Univeristy of Deleware where she studied Chemistry before heading off to Vanderbilt University to study medicine. After completing her training in Pediatrics at St Christopher’s Hospital in Philadelphia, Dr. Hassink began a long trailblazing road to treating childhood obesity, starting a weight management clinic in 1988 at Alfred I. duPont Children’s Hospital in Delaware well before most pediatricians even realized there was an issue to address.
She is now internationally recognized as an expert in childhood obesity prevention, testifying before Congress and serving as chair of the Delaware Governor’s council on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and directing the AAP Institute for Healthy Childhood Weight. She has served as the president of the American Academy of Pediatrics, chaired the AAP Obesity Leadership Workgroup, the AAP Institute for Healthy Childhood Weight Advisory Committee, and the AAP Strategic Planning Committee. Dr.  Hassink is the chair of the Institute for Medicaid Innovation Child and Adolescent Subcommittee and a member of the  National Advisory Board. She authored numerous articles for parents and pediatricians and two books: “Pediatric Obesity: Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment Strategies for Primary Care” and “A Clinical Guide to Pediatric Weight Management.”
In a word, she is a teacher.
Today, we have the privilege of learning.
Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 12 Issue 39

Coronavirus Update #70 GOOD NEWS: This information is so important to help us all understand risk. Stratified risk is the only true way to measure personal risk. Let us look at some CDC data from the spring Omicron BA.1 and .2 spikes versus the fall 2021 delta wave.
Median age of hospitalization has increased from 60 years old with Delta to 64 with BA.1 and 71 with BA.2. Any underlying medical condition associated with hospitalization increased from 89% with Delta to 92% with BA.1 to 95% with BA.2 respectively. Length of hospital stay decreased from 4.8 to 3.9 to 3.3 days. ICU admission was down from 24% to 18% to 13% of admitted patients. Mechanical ventilation decreased from 14% to 8% to 6% of admitted patients. And Finally, death from 12% to 8% to 5% overall.

What we can glean from this data set is very clear. With successive SARS2 mutations coupled to increased population based exposure to virus via infection or vaccine, we are now seriously in a reduced risk state unless you are older than 65 years with a comorbid disease or younger than 65 with a serious disease. 95% of hospitalizations were related to a comorbid disease regardless of age. The other big takeaway was this: if you are in this high risk group, getting every available booster is vital to your survival based on the risk reduction data. For everybody else, the data is clear, you are ok – to boost or not to boost is up to you. But, absolutely work on your general health.

To your health,
Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 12 Issue 37

Coronavirus Update 69.

Quick Hits and other musings –
1) In the interview with Dr. Offit there were a few big take aways:
  • Boosters for non risk based teen and young adults are unlikely to provide benefit while offering a small but real level of risk from myocarditis
  • Boosters are offering minimal benefit to the nation from a transmission perspective. At best 8-12 weeks of protection against symptomatic disease
  • Dr. Offit voted against adding omicron antigens to this fall’s booster as there was limited data that it would any benefit. He was in the minority at the FDA advisory meeting, thus this fall’s booster will have new strain genetics in it
  • The boosters could, not shown yet in humans, block future variant immunity to newer strains through viral immune imprinting

A lot more this week to digest.

Dr. M