literature review

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 14 Issue 19

The Book that I never published. It is time for me to take another look at the mother child story in book form. In 2019, I embarked on a project of writing a book about maternal health and WHY it matters tremendously that we address the issues driving offspring dysregulation. The time since has ushered in an era of podcast guests that in some instances have solidified my beliefs on knowns while also shattering some beliefs leading to new ideas. Over the coming weeks, I am going to relook at this topic.
Part of this project is going to be taking a page out of the Derek Sivers’ book writing style, brevity and meaning are paramount. I am naturally hyper verbose and my writing style follows this reality. Thus, I am going to fight my natural style and desires in an effort to make this book shorter, much shorter and still powerful in delivery.
Here goes!
WHY?
The story of normal maternal health and how we are disrupting it in modern America…….Also a Literature review and recipe of the week!
Enjoy,
Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 14 Issue 17

Literature Review
1) In a first of its kind study in mice, we see concrete evidence for how the mitochondria in obese individuals are a root cause of disease based on nutritional input. This fascinating animal translational study gives us insight into how a high fat diet is also a major component of mitochondrial damage through fission and fragmentation leading to worsened cell bioenergetics. The cells have reduced fatty acid oxidation or fat burning capacity due to a single gene’s actions. The end result is a tilt toward fat cell production, fat storage and fat cell inflammation which are associated with diabetes and insulin resistance and ultimately metabolic syndrome. This starts to explain the paradox that is obesity where the person has a ton of stored energy, but has limited capacity to utilize it. It is like having a gas tank of fuel with a gas line that only allows for 1/10th of the flow required for optimal function. Science Daily has an excellent review of this paper. Link below. 
2) Women’s brains change during pregnancy as per a new study. The authors looked at brain changes before and after birth as well as with or without a vaginal delivery route. Their study findings noted transient changes in some brain regions as well as permanent changes in other brain regions that turn on self-reflection and empathy for others…… and a recipe of the week.
Enjoy,
Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 14 Issue 12

Pregnancy is a super important time. Do not take by inhalation, ingestion or other exposure anything that is a potential toxin for the body.
Things to avoid:
1) Caffeine – in low to minimal doses, it is clear that caffeine is safe for pregnant women and their offspring. Caffeine easily crosses into the placenta and thus the baby’s circulation. In utero babies cannot metabolize caffeine well putting them at risk with increasing exposure. The data does not support the same reality for more moderate to high doses. Caffeine is known to raise blood pressure and heart rate in all users in variable numbers based on metabolism capabilities…… plus a literature review and a recipe.
Enjoy,
Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 14 Issue 11

Measles Overview Again
From the CDC: As of this week, there have been 35 cases of measles, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported including seven direct importations of measles by international travelers and two outbreaks with more than five cases each. Most of these cases were among children and adolescents who had not received a measles-containing vaccine (MMR or MMRV), even if age eligible. (Site) In 2023, there were 58 total cases. A far cry from the 1274 cases in 2019, but still a sign that risk persists for some unvaccinated and immune compromised people.
What is measles – a refresher?
Measles is a serious, highly contagious and potentially deadly viral infection. It is caused by an RNA paramyxovirus. It is spread by contact with droplets from an infected person’s nose, mouth or throat. Sneezing and coughing can aerosolize the droplets and increase the range of infectious spread.
Enjoy, Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 14 Issue 8

Literature Review
1) Cancer is now a unique risk factor for Cardiovascular disease according to recent research. This is being discussed as a point of emphasis for those that have been diagnosed with cancer as the knowledge is a wake up alarm to the biological underpinnings of these disparate immune based diseases. (Melchiori R. et. al. 2023) If you have a strong family history of cancer and heart disease as I do, this data needs to be understood for a prevention lens focus. In a few weeksx I will be discussing APOE genotypes for understanding these realities.
2) In a translational model, sulphurophane increases mitochondrial biogenesis…..Plus a continuous glucose monitor experiment and more from Alison Gopnik’s book.
Enjoy,
Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 14 Issue 6

Literature Review
1) Psilocybin is showing further signs of great promise in the fight against depression and PTSD. Psychedelic assisted psychotherapy has gained a foothold in the mainstream of treatment interventions for treatment resistant depression and PTSD. Psilocybin comes from a mushroom that has serotonergic effects on the receptor 5HT2A in the human brain. The results of the studies were net positives in reducing major mood disorder symptoms that are known to be long term in effect. (Haikazian et. al. 2023) I am very excited to see this therapeutic space expand into traumatized teens and other subsets to see outcome benefits. 2) Nanoplastics in the research in the Journal PNAS….. And a section on Antibiotic resistance.
Enjoy,
Dr. M

Dr. M’s SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 14 Issue 4

Literature Review
1) In an excellent paper by Dr. Harlan and colleagues, we see a group looking at how to modify ultra processed foods to remain tasty for consumption but also healthy. The lead author is Dr. Rob Lustig, a pioneering Pediatric Endocrinologist from UCSF and upcoming podcast guest. From the paper: “Ultraprocessed food is established as a metabolic disruptor acting to increase adiposity, reduce mitochondrial efficiency, drive insulin resistance, alter growth, and contribute to human morbidity and mortality. Consumer packaged goods (CPG) companies are beginning to understand the detrimental impact of the food they market, and have employed substitution strategies to reduce salt, sugar, and fat. However, the harms of ultraprocessed foods are far more complex than any single component, and are not ameliorated by such simple substitutions.” (Harlan et. al. 2023)……as well as information on Why ask why? and a recipe of the week.
Enjoy,
Dr. M

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