Media/Electronics/Screens

Here’s Why It’s Important to Manage Your Children’s Media Exposure (Archived Pedcast)

 OK, I am going to get a little personal with this installment of Portable Practical Pediatrics, I am going to tell you a real life story that happened to yours truly, when I was in high school, 10th grade to be specific that involved media exposure.  This story speaks directly to the question I posed in the title of this pedcast: “Should parents care about what media their children watch during childhood?”  An important question for today’s parents to ponder so hang with me for this important edition of Portable Practical Pediatrics

Continue reading

Playgrounds, No Parents Allowed (Archived Pedcast)

In this early episode of Portable Practical Pediatrics (originally posted July 2010), get a heavy dose of Doc Smo opinion that may change the way you think of sports for your children. According to Doc Smo, balancing structured and unstructured sports is an important task for parents and one that is often not done well. Give a listen. open your heart, and see if his message resonates.

Continue reading

Here’s Why Parents Should Care What Media their Children Watch? (Pedcast)

Introduction

    Doc Smo here. Thanks for joining me today. OK, I am going to get a little personal with this installment of Portable Practical Pediatrics, I am going to tell you a real life story that happened to yours truly, when I was in high school, 10th grade to be specific that involved media exposure.  This story speaks directly to the question I posed in the title of this pedcast: should parents care about what media their children watch during childhood?  An important question for today’s parents to ponder so hang with me for this important edition of Portable Practical Pediatrics Continue reading

Can You Prevent Your Children From Needing Eye Glasses? (Archived Pedcast)

Topic Introduction

As if there aren’t enough reasons to turn off the screens and get your kids outside, here is another big one. We now have proof, from a big study done in China, a study that spanned over a few years, that being outside and being away from close-up work like reading and looking at screens significantly reduces a child’s chances of developing nearsightedness, a condition also called myopia.I guess the Chinese are particularly interested in myopia since they have such high incidence of myopia. Among urban older Chinese, the rate of nearsightedness is currently 90%.  I guess that is why they invented glasses– a very strong need. So it is fitting that the Chinese were the ones who proved that spending at least 40 minutes outside on a daily basis, greatly reduces a child’s chance of becoming myopic.

Continue reading