Trends in Healthcare

Less Cold and Cough Medicine in Children Means Fewer ED Visits (Article)

 

Cold and cough medications (CCMs) have been linked to a high number of emergency department visits and rare cases of deaths in infants and children. It is for this reason that manufacturers and government agencies stopped recommending these medications be used for children less than four years of age. In 2007, manufacturers voluntarily withdrew infant cough and cold medications sold over the counter from the US market. In 2008, the US government acted to revise labels of over the counter CCMs to warn against use by children < 4 years. These new recommendations and labeling revisions have been followed by efforts to educate parents about the dangers of giving over the counter CCMs to infants.

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New Treatment for Migraine (Article)

If you are one of the 37 million Americans who suffer from migraines, you know the symptoms all too well: pounding pain in a specific area in your head, nausea, and sensitivity to light and sound. You continually reach for the Advil to relieve your pain, but it doesn’t always work, or sometimes even causes additional discomfort from side effects. Some other prescription anti-migraine drugs have side effects that numerous patients can’t handle. For example, pregnant women, women who certainly require relief from migraines, often cannot take some of these drugs because some cause birth defects and other potential side effects of the medicines. Shouldn’t there be a more effective, less risky solution? Now there is for adult migraine sufferers and hopefully children as well soon.

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Fat Kids, Sick Hearts? (Article)

 

 

 

Information keeps rolling in from the medical community that being obese as a child is bad for a child’s health, especially their cardiovascular system. In fact, a recently published study from Germany documented that obese German children had, on average, have higher levels of blood pressure, more fats in their blood, higher blood sugar and insulin levels, and thicker heart muscles. None of this is good news for these children. Each of these parameters predicts future trouble.

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The Cost of Childhood Obesity (Article)

Tackling the obesity problem has been on the forefront of the minds of politicians, doctors, and parents. Childhood obesity, defined as a BMI greater than 99% of the population, affects 20% of the children between the ages of 6 to 19 years old. This rate has doubled during the last two decades. A US Task Force on Childhood Obesity has set an ambitious goal to reduce that number to 5% by 2030. With the help of everyone who cares for children, I believe this is both achievable and cost effective.

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