Tag Archives: diabetes

Exploring How Snacks Can Harm Kids (Pedcast)

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Musical Introduction

Thanks for stopping by DocSmo.com, where portable, practical pediatrics is our specialty! Our goal is to provide pediatric advice on your schedule, answering your questions on any topic concerning your children. Today, we will be talking about one of my personal pet peeves, how seemingly innocent snacking poses some serious consequences for your children’s health. Diabetes, heart disease, pancreatic issues, obesity, and tooth decay are only a few of the problems that arise from babies and young children eating little puffs, pastries, and crackers and drinking sugary drinks throughout the day. In America, children are treated to little snacks almost round the clock, from sugary cereals at preschool to after-sports snacks of cupcakes and cookies. Continue reading

Dr. Kilbane conducts Mooo U (Pedcast)

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Welcome to an exciting edition of Docsmo.com, where parents can get a free pediatric education on their schedule about the subjects that interest them.  From the diapers to the diploma, if it involves children, we take it on here.  Today I am honored to have as a returning guest, Dr. Sheila Kilbane, an integrative pediatrician with loads of education, knowledge and experience. Today, Dr. Kilbane and I are going to take on a longtime simmering controversy in pediatrics, that of the health value of cows milk.  Yes, controversy…you heard me right. Not everyone agrees that consuming dairy products is healthy, especially many integrative pediatricians.  Since we have one of the best in the world with us today, I thought we would get her thoughts on cows milk as it relates to the health of children.  Welcome Dr. Sheila Kilbane. Are you ready to enlighten my listeners and me about the great cows milk controversy?


SK: Banter


Dr. Kilbane, before we get into the nitty-gritty of the milk controversy, can you run though the anatomy of milk and get our listeners familiar with the terminology that surrounds milk, please? What exactly is milk made of?


SK:  Milk broken down by components

  •  Lactose
  • Casein Whey
  • Calcium
  • Phosphorus
  • Vitamin D
  • Saturated fat
  • Pasteurized

(Explains above briefly)


Section 1- Points of Agreement?

DocSmo: Dr. Kilbane, maybe we should begin our discussion of cow’s milk with a list of things I think the pediatric medical establishment agree on.  Feel free to comment on these points as I go through them, won’t you?

  • Breast milk is the best nutrient for babies in the first year of life.
  • Unmodified, unchanged cow’s milk–you know, the kind we buy in the store and put on cereal–given to an infant in the first year of life is a bad idea. Iron deficiency anemia, milk allergy, mineral content imbalances that can lead to seizures are all reasons why we shouldn’t give any unmodified milk to infants. Remember, infants are babies under a year of age.
  • In older children, raw, unpasteurized cow’s milk can cause infections such as Listeria, TB, Campylobacter, E Coli, Salmonella, Brucella. Sounds bad, doesn’t it!

SK: Actually, the risks of drinking unpasteurized cow’s milk are very low. There have been very few cases of sickness.  

(195 hospital trips, and 2 deaths between 1998-2009–CDC)

 


  • Full fat foods are needed for 1-2 year olds, and that includes whole cow’s milk if milk is in the child’s diet

  SK: I don’t recommend dairy after an infant’s first birthday.  Other fat sources …

 


  • Leaner cow’s milk is preferred after 2 years of age. AAP recommends 2 servings of lean cow’s milk daily. That’s skim, or other low fat milks.

SK: Dairy is not the healthiest food source of calcium…


  • There are many babies who are allergic to milk, especially in the first 6 months of life, probably in the 5% range.      Cows milk allergy generally disappears by 2 years of age and is unusual in children over two years of age.

SK: sensitivity studies. Dramatic improvement off dairy. Examples


  • Lactose intolerance is rare in babies

 

SK: Lacto free milk not appropriate for milk allergic children…


  • Experts say Fortified Vitamin D milk is a good source of vitamin D in children.

 SK: Too much milk for too little vitamin D


Section 2-Points of Controversy

OK, Dr. Kilbane, enough for the things we can agree on, now let’s get into the controversies:

  • According to many experts, including the USDA and the American Academy of Pediatrics, cow’s milk is an essential nutrient for children, providing nutrients that are difficult to get elsewhere (those nutrients being essential fats, calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D).

SK: Strongly disagree.  Saturated fat, difficult to get calcium, phosphors too high. “Company that fats keep.”…


  • Cow’s milk consumption promotes cardiovascular disease, diabetes, allergy, and cancer

SK: rats with the casein studies…


 

 

  • Cows milk consumption prevents osteoporosis in adults

SK: cite studies


  • Organic milk is better than non organic.-

 

SK: organic or nonorganic…cows pregnant all the time. Hormones high- promote cancers… 


Conclusion:

Dr. Kilbane, you always make us think out of the box when you bring your wisdom. I now can see why the most famous pediatrician of the twentieth century, Dr. Benjamin Spock, felt that drinking cow’s milk in childhood was destructive to children. It seems like time may be proving him correct. As I started to do my research for this podcast, I was actually surprised at how little evidence there is to justify the strong message that children must drink milk. It seems that this recommendation is justified more out of tradition than science. I suspect that the truth about milk lies somewhere between the two extreme positions you hear when you read about this subject…some claiming that milk causes most of the degenerative diseases in the Western world versus others insisting that milk is an absolutely essential nutrient to normal growth. Which type and how much dairy is healthiest for children only time will tell. Hopefully, we are getting closer to that answer.

I want to thank Dr. Sheila Kilbane for joining us today and bringing her perspective to my listeners and me. She is one of my favorite guests. Make sure you take a few minutes to check out her website at http://www.sheilakilbane.com/ and listen to the other podcasts we have made together that are posted on http://www.docsmo.com. They are full of Kilbane wisdom. This is Dr. Paul Smolen, hoping today’s pedcast helped make your decision whether to feed your children cow’s milk as smooth as silk.  Until next time.


Smo Notes:

1.

 http://www.pcrm.org/health/cancer-resources/ask/ask-the-expert-dairy-products

Effective Help for obese Children-Start Early (Article)

Finding a way to reduce the number of over-nourished children is one of the great challenges for our society today. Health experts are fairly certain that by eliminating obesity among children, we will greatly be able to reduce the number of today’s children who go on to become diabetic, have heart disease, and cancers. We urgently need a way to help a lot of obese children.

New research reveals that early intervention for obese children has a reasonable chance of success. Investigators found that intensive education for families with obese 6-9 year olds had a 44% chance of lowering the obese child’s BMI. If the same intervention was done for the obese 10-13 year olds, only 20% of these children were successful at lowering their BMI. The news was even worse for the obese 14-16 year olds, with a success rate of only 8%. Could it be that, as a general rule, the earlier an intervention is begun, the more effective it will be? This fact is certainly true when it comes to the treatment of autism, the treatment of inborn errors of metabolism that some children inherit, and the prevention of problems seen in children who experience psycho-social deprivation to name a few. It is beginning to look like the smart thing for society to do is to spend its biggest resources at prevention when children are very young as opposed to spending money later in their lives when intervention is much less likely to be successful. This recent study certainly gives us something to think about. Until next time.

Smo Notes:

1. Response of severely obese children and adolescents to behavioral treatment. Danielsson PKowalski JEkblom ÖMarcus C.     Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012 Dec;166(12):1103-8. doi: 10.1001/2013.jamapediatrics.319.

The China Study (Book Review Pedcast)

 

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Feeding your children the healthiest diet possible is the goal of every parent but exactly what is a healthy diet? Answering that question is the reason that we at the DocSmo.com blog thought a book review of a major new book on nutrition might be helpful to parents.  The China Study, by T. Colin Campbell, PhD and Thomas M. Campbell II, MD, is a cumulative work based on the findings from  careers in nutritional research and medicine.  A myriad of research is discussed in the book but the core conclusions are derived from a longitudinal (20 year) study called “The China Study” in which researchers from Cornell University, Oxford University, and the Chinese Academy of Preventative Medicine collected data from 65 counties in 24 provinces in China, comparing diet, lifestyle, and disease characteristics in this huge population.  (The New York Times called this data “The Grand Prix” of epidemiological studies when the results were first published in the early 1990s.) The father and son team of Drs. Campbell digest the China study data and a wealth of other scientific observations. Their main conclusion is that populations consuming the most animal-based foods are afflicted with the most chronic Western diseases. The China Study therefore advocates for a diet that consists exclusively of whole plant-based foods as well as discussing the science behind this conclusion, barriers to its introduction in the American diet, and lifestyle tips for readers ready to transition to this nutritional mindset and lifestyle.

Similar to many books on nutrition, the authors start with an overview of the problems related to childhood and adult obesity and chronic disease in the United States. This highlights the general confusion that many feel with an overwhelming amount of  health and nutrition information. This book may provide a useful guide for providing better nutrition for their children. Their goal is to clarify confusion by referencing sound scientific data, instead of providing the latest sensation in rapid weight-loss. They seek to demonstrate a strong connection between eating animal protein and the high incidence of chronic disease plaguing Western societies; cancer, diabetes, and coronary heart disease.  The authors continue with manageable chapters about the nutrition science and mechanisms of disease.  The authors believe that the consumption of animal protein trigger breast and prostate cancers, cause obesity that is at the root of adult onset diabetes, and contributes to diseases of the heart and blood vessels.  The book  highlights the correlation between nutrition and disease, citing a wealth of scientific evidence.

In our opinion, the useful sections in the book are right in the middle, where the authors list eight principles of how to rethink nutrition and provide an eating guide for parents and children. Aside from eliminating all animal products and minimizing added vegetable oils such as peanut or olive oil, he encourages plants and whole grains. The authors are especially harsh on added supplements, believing that a sound diet should provide individuals with everything they need, except for a nod to vitamin D for children and adults who spend the majority of their time indoors and vitamin B12. The last third of the book discusses with the barriers to adopting this way of eating, exposing some startling realities of powerful lobbying groups and their influence on formulating government dietary recommendations.

Overall, this book highlights the important relationship between nutrition and chronic disease. If the authors are right, our health and the future health of our children depend on us adopting a plant-based diet, now.  It promotes a whole-grain, plant-based diet in order to avoid chronic disease, and reverse them once they have developed.  This book presents sound scientific data based on decades of biochemical research and explains the science behind the studies in a clear and manageable way. As the authors say, they take us where the data leads.  To be clear, this book is not a weight-loss solution or another fad diet.  It is a scholarly look at decades of research illuminating the connection between poor nutrition and incidence of chronic diseases. Despite its length and complexity, we would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in diet as it relates to your children’s long-term health. The authors believe that not only can diseases like cancer, heart disease, and adult onset diabetes be prevented in our children with a plant-based “vegan” diet, but that these diseases can be REVERSED with food after they have developed.  The Dr. Campbell father/son team challenge traditional nutrition teaching which advocates a diet rich in animal based protein and dairy foods, vitamin and mineral supplements, and often diets with an imbalanced nutrient profile such as the “Atkins” diet.  The authors claim that a completely plant based diet is the key to prevention of heart disease, cancer, and diabetes.  Time will tell us if they are right.  Pass the broccoli, please. We give this book 4 out of 5 DocSmo stars.  Until next time.

Written collaboratively by Angela Solis and Paul Smolen M.D.